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UN says deadly attack on S. Sudan base may be 'war crime'

The United Nations Security Council said the attack which killed at least 58 people on a UN base in South Sudan where thousands of civilians were sheltering may 'constitute a war crime'. Expressing its "outrage" over the attack on Friday, the world body demanded the South Sudan government do more to prevent future attacks against civilians.

Armed mob under guise of peaceful protest attacks U.N. in South Sudan

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - A mob of armed civilians pretending to be peaceful protesters delivering a petition to the United Nations in South Sudan forced their way into a U.N. base sheltering some 5,000 civilians on Thursday and opened fire, the world body said. A U.N. source, speaking on condition of anonymity, said at least 20 people had been killed and 60 wounded in the attack on the base in Bor in northern Jonglei state, where there are Indian and South Korean U.N. peacekeepers. The source warned that the death toll was likely to rise.

At least 58 killed in attack on UN base in South Sudan

The United Nations said Friday at least 58 people were killed and more than 100 others wounded in an attack against one of its bases in South Sudan sheltering thousands of civilians. The top UN official in the war-torn nation, Toby Lanzer, praised peacekeepers from India, Nepal and South Korea for preventing what could have been a massacre of up to 5,000 people, and vowed the world body would use "lethal force" again to protect civilians under their protection.

At least 58 killed in attack on UN base in South Sudan

The United Nations said Friday at least 58 people were killed and more than 100 others wounded in an attack against one of its bases in South Sudan sheltering thousands of civilians. The top UN official in the war-torn nation, Toby Lanzer, praised peacekeepers from India, Nepal and South Korea for preventing what could have been a massacre of up to 5,000 people, and vowed the world body would use "lethal force" again to protect civilians under their protection.

UN sounds alarm over attacks of civilians in South Sudan

The United Nations on Friday sounded the alarm over an upsurge in vicious communal violence in conflict-hit South Sudan, after dozens were killed in an attack on civilians sheltering in a UN base. UN officials said "dozens" of people were killed and scores more wounded on Thursday by gunmen posing as peaceful protestors who stormed a UN base in the war-ravaged town of Bor, one of several sites where thousands of people are sheltering from ethnic violence.

Civilians pay heavy price in worsening S.Sudan war

Gebriel Mabil was sitting at home in Bentiu, South Sudan, when the war found him, a lone bullet tearing through the wall striking his seven-year-old son in the jaw. His son Steven Kueth now sits in a bed in a Nasir hospital, covered in bandages and clinging to life with the help of breathing and feeding tubes. "I worry about my son because I don't know if he will survive in his state," said Mabil, sitting in the hospital in Upper Nile State where his son was transferred after he was shot. Doctors don't know how or if his jaw can ever be repaired.

Child soldiers battle in worsening South Sudan war

Like many 13 year-olds, Gach Chuol is timid, shyly looking down at the ground as he speaks to a stranger. But he is also joining South Sudan's war to avenge the death of his parents, and brandishes an AK-47 assault rifle as he recalls why he traded his school books for arms. "I just want to fight because of what they have done to my parents," said Chuol, speaking at a rally organised by the White Army, a militia that took up arms again to fight government troops in South Sudan's four month-old civil war

South Sudan army admits loss of key oil town of Bentiu

South Sudan's army said Wednesday rebels had wrested control of the key oil town of Bentiu, one of the most bitterly contested regions in the four-month-long conflict. The town, capital of oil-producing Unity state, is the first major settlement to have been retaken in a renewed offensive by forces of rebel leader Riek Machar, a former vice-president.

South Sudan army admits loss of key oil town of Bentiu

South Sudan's army said Wednesday rebels had wrested control of the key oil town of Bentiu, one of the most bitterly contested regions in the four-month-long conflict. The town, capital of oil-producing Unity state, is the first major settlement to have been retaken in a renewed offensive by forces of rebel leader Riek Machar, a former vice-president.

South Sudan rebel leader vows to take key oil fields, capital

The leader of South Sudan's rebels has vowed to attack the capital Juba and target crucial oil fields, warning in an exclusive interview with AFP that the civil war will not end until the country's president is removed from power. Former vice president turned rebel chief Riek Machar branded his arch rival, President Salva Kiir a "dictator" and said he saw "no reason for power sharing". The comments came as the conflict in the world's youngest nation enters its fifth month, and amid warnings of looming famine and floundering peace talks.
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