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US 'troubled' by Myanmar unrest

The United States said Friday it was "deeply troubled" by a new wave of unrest in western Myanmar which has left several people dead, and warned security forces against "excessive force." "We are deeply troubled by reports of violence in the Rakhine state," said State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki. "We're saddened to hear reports that several people have been killed, many injured, at least one missing and hundreds of civilians displaced in violence that included looting and destruction of homes and property."

At least two women and a child were stabbed to death in Myanmar's anti-Rohingya violence

Myanmar's Rakhine state remains extremely tense after several outbreaks of communal bloodshed between Buddhist and Muslim communities since 2012.

UN warns of 'genocide' in C. Africa as parliament seeks new leader

The UN has warned that bloodshed in the Central African Republic could turn into genocide as horrors continue to unfold in the country where parliament is preparing to choose a new leader. Violence in the highly unstable country has not let up despite the resignation last week of strongman Michel Djotodia under intense regional pressure, and at least seven more people were killed in the capital overnight.

UN warns of 'genocide' in C. Africa as parliament seeks new leader

The UN warned Thursday that bloodshed in the Central African Republic could turn into genocide as horrors continue to unfold in the country where parliament is preparing to choose a new leader. Violence in the highly unstable country has not let up despite the resignation last week of strongman Michel Djotodia under intense regional pressure, and at least seven more people were killed in the capital overnight.

U.S. to airlift Rwandan forces into Central African Republic

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. military will soon begin flying Rwandan troops into the Central African Republic, possibly starting on Thursday, in its second such operation in support the African Union's efforts to stem bloodshed there, a U.S. official said on Wednesday. The U.S. official, speaking to Reuters on condition of anonymity, said the airlift operation could last just over a month and would involve two U.S. military C-17 aircraft.

Japan, Ethiopia urge peace in South Sudan

The leaders of Japan and Ethiopia on Monday urged South Sudan's warring parties to sign a ceasefire to end weeks of fighting that has left thousands dead. "We agreed that the cessation of hostilities in South Sudan and national reconciliation is the most important way forward," Ethiopian Prime Minister, Hailemariam Desalegn, said at a joint briefing with his Japanese counterpart.

Violence erupts in Bangui after resignation of ex-rebel leader

Deadly violence including reports of cannibalism and widespread looting erupted in the capital of the Central African Republic after the resignation of its ex-rebel president, who left to Benin Saturday. Michel Djotodia arrived in Benin's capital after stepping down as president under intense diplomatic pressure on Friday, as a flare up of violence in Bangui dashed hopes his resignation would cool tensions in the strife-torn nation.

Former C.African leader lands in Benin

The former Central African Republic president Michel Djotodia on Saturday arrived in Benin, after resigning under pressure for his failure to tackle bloody religious violence in his homeland. An AFP reporter at Cotonou's airport said the former rebel leader stepped off an official Chadian jet at 5:05pm local time (1605 GMT) after a flight from N'Djamena. He was met off the plane by Benin's Foreign Minister, Nassirou Bako Arifari, who earlier confirmed that Djotodia was heading to the tiny west African republic at the request of central African states.

Violence erupts in Bangui despite departure of ex-rebel president

Deadly violence broke out overnight in Bangui following the resignation of the Central African Republic's rebel leader-turned-president -- a move aimed at easing tension -- and ahead of the evacuation of stranded foreigners set to begin Saturday. Sporadic gunfire erupted in the capital killing at least three people -- a Christian vigilante, an ex-Seleka rebel and a civilian, the head of the Central African Red Cross, pastor Antoine Mbaobogo, told AFP.

President's resignation brings rare hope to C. Africa

The resignation of the Central African Republic's rebel leader-turned-president raised hopes Saturday of an end to sectarian strife that has pushed the nation to the brink of collapse. Under intense diplomatic pressure, Michel Djotodia stepped down Friday during a special regional summit in Chad, which called his move a "highly patriotic decision". Djotodia had come under fire for failing to rein in the mainly Muslim rebels who brought him to power in March 2013 and whose abuses triggered retaliatory violence by Christian militias.
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