Connect to share and comment

Little hope for C.Africa Muslims ahead of French president visit

Reeling from savage attacks, Central African Republic's Muslim minority have little faith that Friday's visit by President Francois Hollande will change their fortunes, while the French military has warned that the country cannot only rely on foreign help. Muslims holed up in the capital's PK-5 district -- where they have come under repeated attacks from mainly Christian anti-balaka militias -- are blunt about Hollande's visit.

Central African militia leader arrested in Congo

The self-styled political leader of a militia sowing terror in the Central African Republic has been arrested in north Congo and transferred to Brazzaville, police in the country said Thursday. A former minister under ousted president Francois Bozize, Patrice Edouard Ngaissona -- who calls himself the coordinator of the mostly Christian "anti-balaka" (anti-machete) militia, was arrested Tuesday along with two aides.

Nigeria seeks help from French west Africa to fight Islamists

Nigeria on Tuesday issued an appeal to France and Abuja's Francophone neighbours, especially Cameroon, to help it in the battle against Islamists, two days before a planned visit from French President Francois Hollande. On the day suspected Boko Haram Islamists slaughtered 43 students as they slept, Nigeria's information minister warned the attacks could harm French and other Western interests in West Africa if left unchecked.

Armed groups surround thousands in Central African Republic: U.N

By Serge Leger Kokpakpa BANGUI (Reuters) - Over 15,000 people in Central African Republic, mostly Muslim civilians in makeshift camps, are surrounded and being threatened by armed militia groups, a spokesman for the U.N. refugee agency said on Tuesday. Adrian Edwards told a news briefing in Geneva that the refugees, dotted around 18 locations in the northwest and southwest of the landlocked country, face a high risk of attack and urgently need better security.

The Central African Republic since the French intervention

A snapshot of developments in the Central African Republic since France sent troops to its former colony to help an African force stem sectarian bloodletting. The unrest began when Seleka rebel leader Michel Djotodia seized power in a March 2013 coup, unseating president Francois Bozize and becoming the first Muslim president of the predominantly Christian country. Although Djotodia disbanded the rebels, some of them went rogue, leading to months of killing, rape and pillaging and prompting Christians to form vigilante groups -- the anti-balaka -- in response.

Thousands fleeing Boko Haram find little comfort in Niger

By Misha Hussein DAKAR, Feb 25 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Gremah Umara was hoping for a refuge when he, his wife and their two-year-old daughter fled an Islamist militant attack on their village in northern Nigeria and headed over the border into Niger. They found a respite from the violence, but little else - just scores of their compatriots living rough under trees and sheltering in cardboard boxes, lined up along dusty roads in the impoverished country's Diffa region.

Central African Republic militia says will only disarm after Muslim rebels do

By Media Coulibaly BANGUI (Reuters) - A powerful militia in Central African Republic said on Saturday it will only disarm once its main rivals, the mainly Muslim Seleka fighters, lay down their weapons, a deadlock that risks prolonging the crisis in the war-torn country.

Mob kills three Muslim civilians in C. Africa

Three Muslim civilians in conflict-torn Central African Republic were shot dead on Saturday when the taxi carrying them was stopped by an angry mob, witnesses said. The three men were travelling in the Combattant neighbourhood near the airport in the capital Bangui, where French and African Union troops are headquartered. A crowd chanting anti-Muslim slogans forced their taxi to stop, and then killed them. "It was extraordinarily violent. They were executed in cold blood," one witness told AFP.

Mob kills three Muslim civilians in C. Africa

Three Muslim civilians in conflict-torn Central African Republic were shot dead on Saturday when the taxi carrying them was stopped by an angry mob, witnesses said. The three men were travelling in the Combattant neighbourhood near the airport in the capital Bangui, where French and African Union troops are headquartered. A crowd chanting anti-Muslim slogans forced their taxi to stop, and then killed them. "It was extraordinarily violent. They were executed in cold blood," one witness told AFP.

11 dead as Libya military plane crashes in Tunisia

A Libyan army medical plane crashed south of Tunis early on Friday, killing all 11 people on board, Tunisian emergency services said. "The plane crashed at 1:30 am (0030 GMT)... with 11 people on board -- three doctors, two patients and six crew members," spokesman Mongi El Kadhi said. He said there were no survivors from the accident in the Grombalia area, 40 kilometres (25 miles) south of the capital. str-alf/kir
Syndicate content