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MDA signs a $16-million submarine training deal with Royal Canadian Navy

RICHMOND, B.C. - MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (TSX:MDA) has signed a deal with the Royal Canadian Navy to provide support for its submarine training simulators in Halifax. The four-year deal, which includes options for an additional two years, is valued at more than $16 million. The simulators are used to train personnel on operating and maintaining Victoria-class submarines. The company said it has been providing training and maintenance support for the submarine simulators since 2009.

Sea Launch postpones Eutelsat 3B launch date due to damage during launch vehicle movement

LONG BEACH, Calif. - Sea Launch AG has postponed the planned April 15 launch of a communications satellite for France-based Eutelsat because of damage that occurred during movement of the integrated launch vehicle at the company's homeport in Long Beach, Calif. The company said Monday that a decision was made to de-mate the payload from the upper stage to resolve the issue, establish the root cause and perform other checks. Sea Launch said the Eutelsat 3B satellite was not powered on at the time and was unaffected. A new launch date was not immediately announced.

MIT's Sara Seager aims to find extraterrestrials

Washington, Mar 31 (EFE).- Sara Seager, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant recipient, is convinced there is life on other planets and has decided to find it. "I've decided to dedicate my life to finding life on another planet, to find planets like Earth and planets with life on them," the 42-year-old scientist, considered on of the most influential astrophysicists in the world by Time magazine, told Efe.

Space makes the heart grow rounder

Astronauts' hearts grow rounder while they are in space, suggesting that spending lots of time in microgravity could lead to heart problems, according to US research on Saturday. That could mean trouble for people who want to embark on long-term missions to Mars. The data presented at an American College of Cardiology meeting in Washington was based on 12 astronauts who had ultrasounds while in space. Their hearts grew 9.4 percent more spherical in microgravity, and they also weakened.

Comet lander awakes from long hibernation

European space experts said on Friday they had successfully reawakened a fridge-sized robot designed to make the first-ever spacecraft landing on a comet. The 100-kilogramme (220-pound) Philae lander was revived after more than three years of deep space hibernation, in a key phase of a billion-dollar mission launched over a decade ago. France's National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), in Paris, said that the spacecraft had re-established contact with Earth, and that an "initial signal was received at 3.00 pm (1400 GMT) today at mission control in Cologne, Germany".

Russian-U.S. crew makes belated arrival at space station

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (Reuters) - A Russian spaceship carrying two Russian cosmonauts and a U.S. astronaut made a belated arrival at the International Space Station on Thursday, returning the orbital outpost to full staff. Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev and NASA astronaut Steven Swanson blasted off aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket two days ago from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Russian spacecraft docks at ISS after two-day delay

A Moscow-backed spacecraft carrying two Russians and a US astronaut on Friday docked successfully at the International Space Station after a technical hitch caused an unprecedented two-day delay. The Soyuz TMA-12M, carrying Russia's Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev and NASA's Steve Swanson, docked at 3:53 am Moscow time (1153 GMT Thursday), Russia's mission control said. Hours after the successful docking, Russian state media reported that the head of Moscow's mission control, Viktor Ivanov, had been sacked.

Russian spacecraft brings three-man crew to ISS after two-day delay

A Russian spacecraft carrying a three-man Russian and US crew on Friday docked successfully at the International Space Station after an unprecedented two-day delay caused by a technical hitch. The Soyuz TMA-12M carrying Russia's Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev and NASA's Steve Swanson docked at 03:53 am Moscow time (1153 GMT Thursday), Russia's mission control said. "The Soyuz TMA-12M docked automatically to the docking module of the Russian segment of the ISS," mission control said in a statement on its website.

Russian-US crew docks at ISS two days late after technical glitch

A Russian spacecraft with two Russians and a NASA astronaut aboard on Friday docked successfully at the International Space Station after a technical hitch caused an unprecedented two-day delay. The Soyuz TMA-12M carrying Russia's Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev and NASA's Steve Swanson docked at 03:53 am Moscow time (1153 GMT Thursday), Russia's mission control said. Skvortsov was first to open the hatch into the ISS around 7:00 am Moscow time (0300 GMT), hugging the crewmembers already on board and grinning broadly.

Russian spacecraft brings three-man crew to ISS after two-day delay

A Russian spacecraft carrying a three-man Russian and US crew on Friday docked successfully at the International Space Station after an unprecedented two-day delay caused by a technical hitch. The Soyuz TMA-12M carrying Russia's Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev and NASA's Steve Swanson docked at 03:53 am Moscow time (1153 GMT Thursday), Russia's mission control said. "The Soyuz TMA-12M docked automatically to the docking module of the Russian segment of the ISS at 0353 am Moscow time," mission control said in a statement on its website.
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