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Russian-US crew blast off for ISS from Kazakhstan

A crew of two Russian cosmonauts and an American astronaut blasted off Tuesday from Kazakhstan on a Russian Soyuz rocket for the International Space Station, with US-Russia space cooperation pressing on despite the diplomatic standoff over Ukraine. Russians Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev along with Steve Swanson of NASA took off in a spectacular night-time launch at the start of a fast-track six-hour journey to the orbiting laboratory, where they will spend half a year.

U.S.-Russian space trio lands safely despite bad weather

ALMATY (Reuters) - An American astronaut and two Russians who carried a Sochi Olympic torch into open space landed safely and on time on Tuesday in Kazakhstan, defying bad weather and ending their 166-day mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS). "We have a landing!" read a huge TV screen at Russia's Mission Control outside Moscow as the descent capsule hit the frozen ground at 0924 (0324 GMT) southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan in central Kazakhstan.

UrtheCast says two cameras installed on space station, and sending data

A top official with the Vancouver-based firm that developed a pair of cameras for the International Space Station says they have been connected during a spacewalk by two Russian astronauts and are working as expected. Scott Larson, the CEO of UrtheCast Corp. (TSX:UR) also says both cameras — one that shoots photos, the other video —were successfully installed and data was being received from them. "We were able to confirm that the cables were working and that we could communicate with the cameras," he said in an email to The Canadian Press.

Aging ISS a space lab of 'unlimited' opportunity

It may be 350 kilometers (215 miles) above Earth and a place that only a privileged few will ever visit, but the International Space Station is crucial to advances in science, health and technology, experts say. Earlier this month, NASA said the life of the $100 billion ISS would be extended by four years, or until at least 2024, allowing for more global research and scientific collaboration.

International Space Station's orbit raised

Moscow, Jan 18 (EFE).- The average altitude of the International Space Station's orbit was raised 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) on Saturday with the help of the engines of Russia's Progress M-21M cargo craft, the Russian space agency Roscosmos said. The maneuver, which placed the orbital platform at an altitude of 417 kilometers (259 miles), was done in order to create the best possible conditions for docking the next Russian cargo ship, to be launched Feb. 5 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Problems force removal of recently installed Canadian cameras from space station

VANCOUVER - Two Canadian cameras installed at the International Space Station last week have been removed for safety reasons. UrtheCast Corp. (TSX:UR) said Monday that the cameras are now being stored inside the ISS until it can be determined why they weren't receiving any power. Russian astronauts Oleg Kotov and Sergei Ryazansky installed the two high-resolution cameras without any incident on Dec. 27. But shortly after they were put in place, the Mission Control Centre near Moscow reported that it could not receive any data from either camera.

Technical problem delays space station streaming-video venture

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (Reuters) - Spacewalking cosmonauts on Friday installed two cameras outside the International Space Station for a Canadian streaming-video business but then retrieved the gear after electrical connections failed, officials said. Station commander Oleg Kotov and flight engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy left the station's Pirs airlock at 8 a.m. EST (1300 GMT) as the complex sailed 260 miles over Australia, mission commentator Rob Navias said during a NASA Television broadcast of the spacewalk.

NASA astronauts step out on Christmas Eve spacewalk

Two NASA astronauts stepped out Tuesday on a rare Christmas Eve spacewalk to wrap up repairs to an equipment cooling system at the International Space Station. Americans Rick Mastracchio, 53, and Mike Hopkins, 44, floated outside the orbiting lab on a second outing to replace an ammonia pump whose internal control valve failed on December 11. Their task was to retrieve a spare pump module from an external stowage platform and install it. Despite recent concerns about leaking spacesuits, the spacewalk got off to a smooth start.

NASA astronauts step out on Christmas Eve spacewalk

Two NASA astronauts stepped out Tuesday on a rare Christmas Eve spacewalk to wrap up repairs to an equipment cooling system at the International Space Station. Americans Rick Mastracchio, 53, and Mike Hopkins, 44, floated outside the orbiting lab on a second outing to replace an ammonia pump module whose internal control valve failed December 11. Their task was to retrieve a spare pump module from an external stowage platform and install it and, despite recent concerns about leaking spacesuits, the spacewalk got off to a smooth start.

1St spacewalk to repair ISS cooling system a success

Washington, Dec 21 (EFE).- Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Mike Hopkins successfully concluded Saturday their first spacewalk to repair the damaged cooling system of the International Space Station, NASA said. The astronauts were almost six hours outside the ISS and managed to work faster than expected, entirely removing the cooling pump with the faulty valve so they could return to the space station with much of the job done.
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