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Japan government remains upbeat on economy despite worries over exports

By Tetsushi Kajimoto TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan's government upgraded its view on factory output while leaving its overall economic assessment unchanged, sounding upbeat on the world's third-largest economy. The government, in its monthly report issued on Monday, described the economy as "moderately recovering," echoing a similar view last week by the Bank of Japan. Policymakers are confident of a spurt of last-minute demand ahead of a sales tax increase which takes effect April 1.

Stocks close down on worries over China, Ukraine

Europe's main stock markets closed down on Wednesday, with mining shares hit hard by renewed worries over China's economic outlook, analysts said. In New York, traders said that investors were also concerned about tensions over the situation in Ukraine. The London's FTSE 100 lost 0.97 percent to 6,620.9 points, the Dax 30 in Frankfurt slumped 1.28 percent to 9,188.69 points while Paris's CAC 40 ended the day down 1.0 percent to 4,306.26 points compared with Tuesday's closing values.

European stocks mixed after poor Chinese data

Europe's main stock markets traded mixed on Monday as investors responded to economic data from China and the United States. On the corporate front, US-based Chiquita Brands and Ireland's Fyffes Plc said they were merging in a deal that would create the world's biggest banana supplier with annual revenue of $4.6 billion (6.4 billion euros). In European afternoon trade, London's FTSE 100 dipped 0.11 percent to stand at 6,705.06 points and Frankfurt's DAX 30 shed 0.37 percent to 9,316.10 points.

European stocks mostly drop on China strains, Ukraine tension

Europe's main stock markets fell Wednesday on fresh concerns over Chinese growth and after a rollercoaster start to the week caused by the crisis in Ukraine. London's benchmark FTSE 100 index dropped 0.61 percent to stand at 6,782.19 points in afternoon trade, with the heavyweight mining sector knocked by unease over China, traders said. Frankfurt's DAX 30 slid 0.29 percent to 9,561.62 points but in Paris the CAC 40 edged up 0.03 percent compared with Tuesday's closing values to 4,397.35.

US stocks sink on Ukraine worries

US stocks Monday fell sharply as investors recoiled from equities in the face of mounting tensions over Ukraine. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 153.68 points (0.94 percent) to 16,168.03. The broad-based S&P 500 lost 13.72 (0.74 percent) at 1,845.73, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index declined 30.82 (0.72 percent) to 4,227.30. The selling followed sharp losses in European equity markets. "It's all about the flight to safety," said Michael James, managing director of equity trading at Wedbush Securities.

Global markets shudder on Ukraine fears

Global stocks sank Monday, as fears of a conflict between Ukraine and Russia sent investors fleeing to safe-haven assets like gold and the yen, while oil prices soared. In afternoon deals, London's benchmark FTSE 100 index fell 1.53 percent to 6,705.85 points and in Paris the CAC 40 dropped 2.01 percent to 4,319.30 points. Frankfurt's DAX 30 plunged more than 3.0 percent at one stage but later stood at 9,411.37 points, down 2.90 percent from Friday's closing level.

Tokyo leads rebound for Asian shares

Tokyo stocks led a rebound on Asian markets Friday, reversing losses in the previous session as regional bourses took their cue from Wall Street, which shrugged off disappointing economic data. Asian markets were mostly heading for a strong finish to the week, after a downturn Thursday triggered by a trio of gloomy figures from China, the US and Japan that cast a pall over the economic outlook.

Tokyo leads rebound for Asian shares

Tokyo stocks led a rebound on Asian markets Friday, reversing losses in the previous session as regional bourses took their cue from Wall Street, which shrugged off disappointing economic data. Asian markets were mostly heading for a strong finish to the week, after a downturn Thursday triggered by a trio of gloomy figures from China, the US and Japan that cast a pall over the economic outlook.

Greek banks 'victims' of stress test delay: National Bank deputy CEO

By Laura Noonan LONDON (Reuters) - Greek banks ability to lend and make plans is being hampered by a long-running row between their government and the country's international lenders over how much more money they need, the deputy chief executive of the country's largest bank said. National Bank of Greece's Petros Christodoulou told Reuters in an interview that delaying lending may stymie an expected tentative return to growth in 2014.

Asian shares mixed, eyes on US data

Asian markets were mixed Wednesday, with Tokyo stocks dropping after the previous session's surge, as investors awaited US housing data and minutes from the Federal Reserve's last meeting. The yen rebounded in Asia after tumbling on the Bank of Japan's (BoJ) decision Tuesday to boost lending to commercial banks. Tokyo lost 0.52 percent, or 76.71 points, to 14,766.53, Seoul shed 0.20 percent, or 3.98 points, to 1,942.93, while Sydney gained 0.29 percent, or 15.4 points, to 5,408.2.
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