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'Vapers' relieved FDA won't restrict popular e-cigarette flavors

By Curtis Skinner NEW YORK (Reuters) - E-cigarette users breathed a sigh of relief on Thursday after U.S. health officials proposed new rules for the devices that would ban sales to minors, but allow manufacturers to keep offering flavored nicotine liquids beloved by so-called vapers. Mcshalonic Martinez, 25, puffed on a caramel mochachino flavored e-cigarette at the Henley Vaporium in lower Manhattan, saying the device helped him kick his three-pack-a-day smoking habit. He can't imagine going back to traditional cigarettes.

US moves to regulate e-cigarettes

US regulators proposed the first restrictions on the soaring $2 billion market in e-cigarettes Thursday, but some lawmakers and anti-tobacco advocates said the move falls woefully short. The new rules would also apply to other, also previously unregulated tobacco products, including cigars, hookahs, nicotine gels, and pipe tobacco, and are aimed in large part at keeping them away from young people. E-cigarettes are battery-operated devices that deliver vaporized nicotine into an aerosol inhaled by the user.

Taxpayer group asks Alberta's privacy boss to probe potential information breach

EDMONTON - The Canadian Taxpayers Federation is asking Alberta's privacy commissioner to investigate allegations of government interference in the freedom of information process. The federation made the request in a letter to commissioner Jill Clayton. It comes after the CBC revealed documents showing former Health Department press secretary Bart Johnson was in possession of documents requested by the CTF two months before they were handed over.

Taxpayer group asks Alberta's privacy boss to probe potential information breach

EDMONTON - The Canadian Taxpayers Federation is asking Alberta's privacy commissioner to investigate allegations of government interference in the freedom of information process. The federation made the request in a letter to commissioner Jill Clayton. It comes after the CBC revealed documents showing former Health Department press secretary Bart Johnson was in possession of documents requested by the CTF two months before they were handed over.

Electronic cigarettes: How they work, what's in them and who smokes them

ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES: The battery-powered devices made of plastic or metal heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapour that users inhale. Some models are disposable, and some are designed to be refilled with cartridges or tanks containing what enthusiasts call "e-juice." Some e-cigarettes are made to look like a real cigarette with a tiny light on the tip that glows like the real thing.

Feds propose e-cigarette regulations, including banning sales to minors, new product approval

WASHINGTON - The federal government wants to ban sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels. While the proposal being issued Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration won't immediately mean changes for the popular devices, the move is aimed at eventually taming the fast-growing e-cigarette industry. The agency said the proposal sets a foundation for regulating the products but the rules don't immediately ban the wide array of flavours of e-cigarettes, curb marketing on places like TV or set product standards.

Ontario PCs file notice of intent to defend against premier's $2M libel suit

TORONTO - Ontario's Progressive Conservatives have served notice they intend to "vigorously defend themselves" against a $2 million libel suit filed by Premier Kathleen Wynne. The suit stems from Opposition Leader Tim Hudak's comments suggesting that Wynne "oversaw and possibly ordered the criminal destruction of documents'' related to the $1.1-billion cancellation of two gas plants. Lawyers for the Tories today filed a notice of intent to defend in the libel suit, saying the Conservatives don't believe any of their comments "constitute actionable defamation" of Wynne.

'Privacy' shows audience it hasn't got much in digital age

By Michael Roddy LONDON (Reuters) - "Privacy" may well be the first play to open by asking the audience members to please leave their mobile phones turned on, and advising those few spectators who haven't got one to look at their neighbor's. Those smart phones are among the stars of the new play by British playwright James Graham, which opened this week at London's intimate Donmar Warehouse. And like a late-generation phone, "Privacy" is crammed with an awful lot of features.

NGO urges Obama to work with allies on N. Korea human rights

SEOUL, April 24 (Yonhap) -- Human Rights Watch has called on U.S. President Barack Obama to cooperate with his South Korean and Japanese counterparts to address the dismal human rights condition in North Korea. The New York-based international human rights organization has also urged Obama to discuss new United Nations efforts to ensure accountability for crimes against humanity in North Korea during his trip this week to Japan and South Korea.

Colombia to raise liquidity requirements for brokerages

BOGOTA (Reuters) - Colombia's financial regulator said on Wednesday it will increase the proportion of liquid assets brokerages must hold starting in November, in a bid to reduce exposure to risk. The regulator said it will alter, and impose limits on, the way it measures liquidity risk. The new rules will require brokerages to hold a big enough share of liquid assets in their portfolios to offset risk from cash investments, term deposits and investments in derivatives.
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