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European court scraps phone, email data collection law

Europe's top court on Tuesday struck down an EU law forcing telecoms operators to store private phone and email data for up to two years, judging it too invasive, despite its usefulness in combating terrorism. By allowing EU governments to access the data, "the directive interferes in a particularly serious manner with the fundamental rights to respect for private life and to the protection of personal data," the European Court of Justice (ECJ) said.

European court scraps phone, email data collection law

Europe's top court on Tuesday struck down an EU law forcing telecoms operators to store private phone and email data for up to two years, judging it too invasive, despite its usefulness in combating terrorism. By allowing EU governments to access the data, "the directive interferes in a particularly serious manner with the fundamental rights to respect for private life and to the protection of personal data," the European Court of Justice (ECJ) said.

Seoul mulling U.N. office on N. Korean human rights

SEOUL, April 8 (Yonhap) -- South Korea will positively consider hosting a United Nations office on North Korea's human rights violations if it receives a formal request, the foreign ministry said Tuesday. Following a U.N. commission of inquiry's report accusing the North of dire human rights violations, the U.N. Human Rights Council adopted a resolution in late March calling on the international community to take steps to bring those responsible to justice.

Smartphone addiction highly linked to cyber-bullying: poll

SEOUL, April 8 (Yonhap) -- One out of five adolescents in South Korea is addicted to smartphones, with the addicts more vulnerable to bullying in cyberspace, a poll showed Tuesday. According to the survey of 4,998 students aged 10 to 17 conducted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government in November, 2.9 percent of the respondents were categorized as "a high addiction-risk group" and 16.1 percent were in a "potentially" dangerous group. Those who were prone to addiction experienced more cyber-bulling both as bullies and victims.

Smartphone addiction highly linked to cyber-bullying: poll

SEOUL, April 8 (Yonhap) -- One out of five adolescents in Seoul City is addicted to smartphones, with the addicts more vulnerable to bullying in cyberspace, a poll showed Tuesday. According to the survey of 4,998 students aged 10 to 17 conducted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government in November, 2.9 percent of the respondents were categorized as "a high addiction-risk group" and 16.1 percent were in a "potentially" dangerous group. Those who were prone to addiction experienced more cyber-bulling both as bullies and victims.

San Diego mayor accused of sex harassment released from house arrest

By Laila Kearney (Reuters) - Former San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, who resigned last year amid a torrent of sexual harassment allegations and was later convicted of abusing three women, said on Monday he had spent his court-ordered home confinement working to correct his behavior and regain his integrity. Filner was sentenced to 90 days of house arrest in addition to three years of probation in December after pleading guilty to criminal charges of false imprisonment and battery involving three women.

MDs need to prepare for eventual legalized assisted suicide, some doctors argue

TORONTO - Doctors need to move beyond the "yes or no" debate about physician-assisted death and begin preparing policies and guidelines in the event the act is legalized in Canada, a group of palliative-care specialists argues. In a commentary in Monday's Canadian Medical Association Journal, the doctors say the debate about assisted suicide has become mired in for-and-against arguments. "And we felt this focus of the debate was rapidly becoming obsolete," co-author Dr. James Downar said in an interview.

Sebelius at conference: Health is 'great global connector,' nations cannot ignore disease

BOULDER, Colo. - Health is the "great global connector" and ignoring disease in other nations will punish people everywhere as the world increasingly is connected by air travel and food transported across the globe, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said Monday. Speaking at the opening of the University of Colorado's Conference on World Affairs, Sebelius said nations not only have a practical and economic reason but also a humanitarian one to work together to innovate and share knowledge about advances in fighting disease, whether it's cancer or cholera.

Tunisia seeks tougher sentences for rapist policemen

Tunisia's public prosecutor appealed a seven-year jail term on Monday for two policemen jailed for rape, and demanded a retrial with a view to seeking tougher sentences. The prosecution insists on characterising the facts as "sex under duress with the threat of violence, under Paragraph 227 of the Penal Code, Article 1," his spokesman Sofiene Sliti told AFP. The article provides for capital punishment but Sliti did not indicate whether prosecutors would seek the death penalty.

Walk marks death of Rehtaeh Parsons, father seeks more changes in justice system

HALIFAX - The father of Rehtaeh Parsons says there have been positive changes in the year since his daughter's death, but more must be done to change the treatment of sexual assault victims in the justice system. Glen Canning said Rehtaeh's story has sparked a global conversation about cyberbullying and sexual assault and has triggered societal changes, including the Nova Scotia government's Cyber-Safety Act, which allows people to try to restrict the cyberbully and sue if they or their children are cyberbullied.
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