Connect to share and comment

US Marines headed to Chad park to fight poaching

A small team of US Marines are to head soon to Chad's Zakouma National Park to train local forces in the fight against the poaching threatening the area's elephant herds. Around 15 marines are to arrive in the Central African country by the end of April and will stay for around a month, a military official said. The troops will train a group of approximately 100 rangers from the Chadian environment ministry's mobile brigade tasked with tracking poachers. The marines will train the Chadian rangers on small unit tactics and patrolling, shooting and navigation.

Sri Lanka monk demands capture of wild elephants for temples

A Sri Lankan Buddhist monk led a procession of elephants Wednesday, demanding authorities capture wild pachyderms from the jungle to boost the dwindling number of the animals in temples. Patron of the Tamed Elephant Owners' Association, monk Maagalkanday Sudaththa said temples faced a severe shortage of animals for their annual pageants where caparisoned elephants are paraded.

Counting the cost of East Africa's poaching economy

Organised crime gangs in East Africa are generating staggering profits smuggling ivory and rhino horn with impunity, experts say, threatening both an irreplaceable wildlife heritage and key tourism industries. Kenyan and Tanzanian ports are the "primary gateway" for ivory smuggled to Asia, where demand is fuelled by increasingly affluent markets, especially in China, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) warns. Last year, seizures of ivory shipments reached "record levels", according to a recent Interpol report.

Philippines to build elephant monument from destroyed ivory

The Philippines is to build an elephant monument from the ashes of seized tusks it destroyed in a landmark action against the ivory trade, an official said Thursday. The ash will be mixed with concrete to build a giant sculpture of a mother elephant protecting her calf, said Josie de Leon, chief of the environment ministry's wildlife division. "It is a reminder to everyone about the Philippines' historical action regarding the destruction of ivory," she told AFP.

Elephants can tell difference between human languages

African elephants can differentiate between human languages and move away from those considered a threat, a skill they have honed to survive in the wild, researchers said Monday. The study suggests elephants, already known to be intelligent creatures, are even more sophisticated than previously believed when it comes to understanding human dangers. African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are the largest land animals on Earth and are considered a vulnerable species due to habitat loss and illegal hunting for their ivory tusks.

Indonesian elephants found dead, poisoning suspected

Seven Sumatran elephants have been found dead in western Indonesia and it is thought they were poisoned, a wildlife official said Monday, just the latest deaths of the critically-endangered animals. Dozens of the elephants have died after being poisoned in recent years on Sumatra island, as the creatures come into conflict with humans due to the rapid expansion of palm oil plantations which destroys their habitat.

Indonesian elephants found dead, poisoning suspected

Seven Sumatran elephants have been found dead in western Indonesia and it is thought they were poisoned, a wildlife official said Monday, just the latest deaths of the critically-endangered animals. Dozens of the elephants have died after being poisoned in recent years on Sumatra island, as the creatures come into conflict with humans due to the rapid expansion of palm oil plantations which destroys their habitat.

US bans commercial ivory trade

The United States clamped down on the domestic trade of elephant ivory Tuesday as part of a new drive to help African countries stem the threat to wildlife from poachers. The White House administrative action bans all commercial imports of African elephant ivory, including antiques, as well as all commercial exports -- except for bona fide antiques and certain other items. The outlawed ivory trade is mostly fueled by demand in Asia and the Middle East, where elephant tusks and rhino horns are used in traditional medicine and to make ornaments.

New U.S. ban on ivory sales aimed at saving more elephants

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The White House announced a new ban on sales of elephant ivory within the United States on Tuesday, part of a plan aimed at cracking down on trafficking of wildlife that is threatening some species, including the African elephant, with extinction. The United States has banned imports of ivory since 1989. But the new efforts go further, banning the sale within the United States of most ivory products altogether and limiting sport-hunted trophies to two per hunter per year.

US bans commercial ivory trade

The United States banned the domestic trade of elephant ivory on Tuesday as part of a new drive to help African countries stem the rising threat to wildlife from poachers. The White House administrative action prohibits all commercial imports of African elephant ivory, including antiques, and all commercial exports, -- except for bona fide antiques and certain other items. The outlawed ivory trade is mostly fueled by demand in Asia and the Middle East, where elephant tusks and rhinoceros horns are used in traditional medicine and to make ornaments.
Syndicate content