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Supreme Court declines to hear anti-gay wedding case

The US Supreme Court declined Monday to take up a case filed by a New Mexico photography firm sanctioned for refusing to take a same-sex couple's wedding photos. Elane Photography had been fined under anti-discrimination legislation after declining to offer its services for two women in 2006. The owners of the studio had challenged their punishment in a filing to the Supreme Court, arguing their constitutionally guaranteed right to freedom of expression had been violated.

Brazil, Mexico, France to back Argentina in bonds case in U.S. court

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Brazil, France and Mexico are expected to file papers in the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday backing Argentina in its legal battle with bondholders who refused to take part in debt restructurings from the country's 2002 default, according to a source familiar with the litigation.

Supreme court declines to hear 'I (heart sign) boobies' case

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a school district's appeal over an attempt by officials to ban breast cancer awareness bracelets bearing the message "I (heart sign) boobies," handing victory to two students who challenged the decision on free speech grounds. The court's decision not to take up the case means that an August 2013 ruling by the Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in favor of students Brianna Hawk and Kayla Martinez is left intact.

Supreme Court won't hear appeals of rulings against anti-migrant laws

Washington, Mar 3 (EFE).- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday decided not to hear cases presented by two municipalities with an eye toward reactivating anti-immigrant ordinances that had been annulled by federal courts. The high court rejected the appeals presented by Farmers Branch, Texas, and Hazleton, Pennsylvania, which means the lower court rulings will stand.

Supreme Court won't hear appeals of rulings against anti-migrant laws

Washington, Mar 3 (EFE).- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday decided not to hear cases presented by two municipalities with an eye toward reactivating anti-immigrant ordinances that had been annulled by federal courts. The high court rejected the appeals presented by Farmers Branch, Texas, and Hazleton, Pennsylvania, which means the lower court rulings will stand.

Supreme Court declines to hear Arizona abortion appeal

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeals court ruling that said an Arizona law banning abortions starting at 20 weeks of gestation is unconstitutional, meaning the restrictive state law is struck down. A ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in May 2013 invalidated the law, saying it violated "unalterably clear" legal precedents. The justices' decision not to review the state's appeal means the lower-court ruling remains intact.

US court blocks contraception clause in health care law

A US Supreme Court justice has blocked a stipulation in the new health care reform law that requires some religion-affiliated organizations to provide insurance that includes birth control. Justice Sonia Sotomayor acted late Tuesday just hours before the Affordable Care Act law was to take effect, in response to an order of nuns in Colorado, US media reported. She gave the government until Friday morning to file briefs on the matter. The contraception requirement has been one of the most controversial aspects of the health law.

Supreme Court to take up birth control religion case

The US Supreme Court said Tuesday it will address the question of whether a firm can use religious grounds to limit the availability of birth control on its health plan. The court's nine justices announced they would hear arguments, probably in March or April, in two cases between the US government and firms that object to purchasing health coverage covering certain contraceptive methods. In the first case, President Barack Obama's administration is challenging the refusal of Hobby Lobby Stores to underwrite coverage for certain contraceptive methods.

Supreme Court to take up birth control religion case

The US Supreme Court said Tuesday it will address the question of whether a firm can use religious grounds to limit the availability of birth control on its health plan. The court's nine justices announced they would hear arguments, probably in March or April, in two cases between the US government and firms that object to purchasing health coverage covering certain contraceptive methods. In the first case, President Barack Obama's administration is challenging the refusal of Hobby Lobby Stores to underwrite coverage for certain contraceptive methods.

US Supreme Court declines to review Argentine debt case

The US Supreme Court on Monday refused to consider a landmark appeal by Argentina of a lower court's order to pay around $1.5 billion to two hedge funds. But the decision did not end Argentina's avenues to challenge the 2012 ruling, supported in August on appeal, that it had to pay back all holders of its defaulted bonds, whether or not they took part in a restructuring of those bonds.
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