Connect to share and comment

UN Council presses Mali to launch peace talks

The UN Security Council on Thursday pressed Mali's new government to speed up efforts to start reconciliation talks with Tuareg and Arab groups to end the country's conflict. "The Security Council reiterates its call for an inclusive and credible negotiation process open to all communities of the north of Mali, with the goal of securing a durable political resolution to the crisis and longterm peace and stability," said a council statement.

UN Council presses Mali to launch peace talks

The UN Security Council on Thursday pressed Mali's new government to speed up efforts to start reconciliation talks with Tuareg and Arab groups to end the country's conflict. "The Security Council reiterates its call for an inclusive and credible negotiation process open to all communities of the north of Mali, with the goal of securing a durable political resolution to the crisis and longterm peace and stability," said a council statement.

Mali celebrates its army alongside France, UN

Malian soldiers and international forces paraded through the capital Bamako on Monday during a public holiday marking the 53rd anniversary of the founding of the west African nation's army. Malian soldiers were joined in the Boulevard de l'Independance by UN peacekeepers, members of the European Union mission training Mali's army and troops from Operation Serval, France's military mission which ousted armed jihadists from its former colony last year.

Mali: A year of clashes and political transition

Here is a look at developments in Mali since the French army intervened a year ago to fight back Islamic militants who were advancing towards the capital Bamako. - January 11: The French military launches Operation Serval to support the Malian army and drive back the Islamists, who are pushing south towards Bamako. Air raids in the centre and north of the country drive Islamists from several strongholds in the north.

President wishes Malians 'peace, nothing but peace'

President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita wished 15 million Malians "peace, nothing but peace" as he delivered a New Year greeting Tuesday at the end of one of the most turbulent years in the west African nation's history. "I only want peace, nothing but peace in all regions of Mali, in all communities of Mali, which must take control of their development in a state that will no longer be a Jacobin, a centraliser, but rather a distributor and regulator," he said in a televised address.

US restores privileged partner status to Mali

The United States has restored privileged partner status to Mali as reward for the strife-torn country's gradual return to democracy, the White House said in a statement on Monday. The decision was revealed in the annual revisions to the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), which takes into account improvements or setbacks to democracy in African countries included in the program. AGOA was launched by Congress in 2000, and establishes a program of economic and commercial cooperation with Africa up until 2015.

Four bodies exhumed in Mali thought to be murdered soldiers

Four bodies thought be the remains of soldiers murdered over their allegiance to overthrown Malian president Amadou Toumani Toure have been exhumed in the capital Bamako, judicial sources told AFP on Tuesday. Yaya Karembe, the judge investigating war crimes committed during a coup in March last year which plunged Mali into chaos, had the bodies dug up at a cemetery in southern Bamako on Monday night, a source close to the judge said.

Turnout low in second round of Mali's legislative election

By Tiemoko Diallo and Adama Diarra BAMAKO (Reuters) - Voters in Mali headed to the polls on Sunday but turnout was low for a second round of legislative elections meant to complete democratic transition after a coup last year led to an Islamist takeover of the north. A French-led military intervention in January drove al Qaeda-linked fighters from northern towns, and Malians elected President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita in an August runoff.

Mali elections overshadowed by suicide bombing

Malians began voting on Sunday in the second round of parliamentary elections intended to cap the nation's return to democracy, but overshadowed by the deaths of two UN peacekeepers in an Islamist attack. The polls mark the troubled west African nation's first steps to recovery after it was upended by a military coup in March last year, finalising a process begun with the election of its first post-conflict president in August.

Mali elections overshadowed by suicide bombing

Malians began voting on Sunday in the second round of parliamentary elections intended to cap the nation's return to democracy, but overshadowed by the deaths of two UN peacekeepers in an Islamist attack. The polls mark the troubled west African nation's first steps to recovery after it was upended by a military coup in March last year, finalising a process begun with the election of its first post-conflict president in August.
Syndicate content