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US denounces Kabul hotel attack

The US State Department Friday sent condolences to the relatives of an AFP reporter killed in a shooting at a Kabul hotel and denounced "barbaric" attacks by insurgents in Afghanistan. Secretary of State John Kerry "is incredibly sorry for the loss that AFP has experienced, and certainly, our heart and our condolences go out to the family of that reporter," spokeswoman Jen Psaki said.

US denounces Kabul hotel attack

The US State Department Friday sent condolences to the relatives of an AFP reporter killed in a shooting at a Kabul hotel and denounced "barbaric" attacks by insurgents in Afghanistan. Secretary of State John Kerry "is incredibly sorry for the loss that AFP has experienced, and certainly, our heart and our condolences go out to the family of that reporter," spokeswoman Jen Psaki said.

Taliban gunmen kill 9 at hotel in Afghan capital

Kabul, Mar 21 (EFE).- Four Taliban gunmen killed nine people in an attack on one of the most heavily guarded hotels in the Afghan capital, authorities said Friday. The restaurant of the luxury Hotel Serena was packed with people around 9:00 p.m. Thursday when the teenage assailants walked in and started shooting. Many of the diners were at the Serena to celebrate the eve of Nawroz, the ancient Persian new year, which is observed throughout Southwest Asia.

Ottawa condemns Kabul attack that killed two Canadians

The Canadian government on Friday condemned a Taliban attack on a Kabul hotel which killed nine people including two of its citizens, and called for the perpetrators to be punished. "Canada condemns this brazen and cowardly terrorist attack on the Serena Hotel, in Kabul, which has claimed the lives of many and left several people injured," Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird said in a statement. Baird offered condolences to the families and friends of those who were killed or injured.

New Afghan leaders must root out corruption: US watchdog

Next month's Afghan elections provide a unique chance to usher in a new leadership capable of weeding out systemic corruption threatening to undermine the country's future, a top US official said Thursday. America has poured some $102 billion into Afghanistan since invading the country in 2001 to throw out the hardline Taliban militants.

Chronology: A timeline of key events in Canada's combat mission in Afghanistan

A chronology of key dates spanning Canada's military mission in Afghanistan: 2001 Oct. 7: Prime Minister Jean Chretien announces Canada's participation in an international anti-terrorism mission in Afghanistan December: Canada establishes military presence in Afghanistan with the arrival of about 40 troops from Joint Task Force 2 (JTF2), a secretive special forces unit. 2002 Feb. 2: First regular combat troops, members of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, arrive in Afghanistan for a six-month mission.

Harper welcomes troops home from Afghanistan, declares May 9 a day of honour

OTTAWA - The last Canadian soldiers to leave Afghanistan arrived home Tuesday to tears, hugs from family and friends and a pledge from Stephen Harper that May 9 will be set aside to honour their contributions and sacrifices. "On that day, Canada will recognize those who fought, remember those who fell and salute all who contributed," the prime minister said as he welcomed home the last 93 soldiers.

Families of fallen Canadians reflect on loss; hope Afghans live up to sacrifices

OTTAWA - Was it all worth it? It is a brutally awkward question, especially when posed in the context of Afghanistan. There is no shortage of people opining about the now-concluded military mission that morphed into a costly, bloody humanitarian exercise. But few of those voices truly count as much as the ones who've stayed largely silent through the tempest of this war — the families of the fallen, some of whom are speaking up for the first time in a series of interviews with The Canadian Press.

Families of fallen Canadians reflect on loss; hope Afghans live up to sacrifices

OTTAWA - Was it all worth it? It is a brutally awkward question, especially when posed in the context of Afghanistan. There is no shortage of people opining about the now-concluded military mission that morphed into a costly, bloody humanitarian exercise. But few of those voices truly count as much as the ones who've stayed largely silent through the tempest of this war — the families of the fallen, some of whom are speaking up for the first time in a series of interviews with The Canadian Press.

Canada and NATO's Afghan exit leaves behind country with a siege mentality

KABUL - A map on the wall at the Gandamack Lodge, a well-worn Kabul haunt for western aid workers, officials and journalists, traces in meticulous detail the disastrous, bloody retreat of British troops from the Afghan capital in January 1842. It was an unmitigated rout. A British and Indian force of 4,300 troops was wiped out, except for an assistant surgeon who escaped and a handful of prisoners left in Afghan hands. The end of what history calls the First Afghan War came as the redcoats staged their last stand near a village called Gandamack.
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