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Brazil troops in World Cup city after looting, murders

Troops patrolled Salvador de Bahia on Thursday after a wave of looting and murder erupted amid a police strike in this Brazilian city that will host World Cup games. At least 19 people were murdered in the first 24 hours after police walked out late Tuesday, a figure well above normal in this northeastern city already plagued by crime, authorities said. The strike also prompted looters to pillage pharmacies, supermarkets, electronics stores and shoe shops in a stealing frenzy that lasted from Tuesday to early Thursday.

Brazil's leader holds wide lead six months from election: survey

BRASILIA (Reuters) - Despite a mushrooming scandal at state-run oil company Petrobras and bad news on the economic front, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff is still the hands-down favorite to win the elections in October, according to a new poll on Wednesday. If the vote were held today, Rousseff would win 40 percent of the ballots, while her two main rivals put together would get only 24 percent, not enough to force a run-off, the poll showed.

Brazil election jitters may hit investments in 2014: source

By Alonso Soto and Luciana Otoni BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazil's presidential vote will likely delay some investment decisions this year but spending on infrastructure is expected to remain strong, a senior government official told Reuters. Although President Dilma Rousseff is the favorite to win the October 5 general election, many investors could withhold funds until the next government outlines its plans for the following four years, which could hamper the country's already slow economic growth.

Brazil election jitters may hit investments in 2014: source

By Alonso Soto and Luciana Otoni BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazil's presidential vote will likely delay some investment decisions this year but spending on infrastructure is expected to remain strong, a senior government official told Reuters on Tuesday. Although President Dilma Rousseff is the favorite to win the October 5 general election, many investors could withhold funds until the next government outlines its plans for the following four years, which could hamper the country's already slow economic growth.

Brazil stock rally shows investors hoping for the worst

By Asher Levine SAO PAULO (Reuters) - Brazilian stocks have soared in recent days despite a deteriorating economic and corporate outlook, and some investors hope things get even worse. After years of complaining that President Dilma Rousseff's government mismanaged the economy and destroyed the market value of state-run firms, investors have latched on to the idea that Brazil's outlook has deteriorated enough to spark change.

Never mind: Poll that sparked Brazil's outrage was wrong

SAO PAULO (Reuters) - It turns out that Brazil is still the land of the bikini. A poll released on March 27 appeared to show that 65 percent of Brazilians believed women in revealing clothes "deserve to be attacked," sparking a furious backlash on social media, concern over risks to tourists during the soccer World Cup, and even a comment from Dilma Rousseff, Brazil's first woman President. But, after more than a week of national soul-searching, a hitch emerged on Friday: The poll was totally wrong.

Brazil hikes key rate to 11%

Brazil raised its key interest rate by 25 basis points to 11 percent Wednesday, as Latin America's largest economy scrambled to contain inflation. The central bank's monetary policy commission (Copom) said the decision continued the process of adjustment begun last April, when the rate stood at 7.25 percent. Copom did not rule out further rate increases. Markets had been expecting the increase; some analysts think the rate will rise to 11.25 percent before the end of 2014.

Brazil's Rousseff remembers coup victims 50 years on

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff on Monday commemorated those killed during the country's military dictatorship half a century ago. "We can bear and overcome the wounds as today we have a social democracy and we can tell our story," said Rousseff, who as a member of a leftist guerrilla movement was imprisoned and tortured under the military regime.

Brazil 'going well and will go better'

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said Saturday that her country was "going well and will go better," after Standard & Poor's cut Brazil's rating to the lowest level for investment grade debt. "We are convinced of the absolute necessity of preserving the soundness of the macroeconomic fundamentals of the country," the president told an annual meeting of the Inter-American Development Bank at a resort in the northeast state of Bahia.

Support for Brazil president drops ahead of October vote

By Paulo Prada RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Popular support for Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has faltered ahead of October's presidential election, a poll showed Thursday, although she remains a favorite to win a second term. With a sluggish economy, high inflation and a scandal surrounding Brazil's state-run oil company, Rousseff's personal approval rating has fallen to 51 percent from 56 percent in November, the survey by the Ibope polling institute and Brazil's National Industry Confederation showed.
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