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NFL, players see progress in tackling concussions

By Scott Malone NEW YORK (Reuters) - Fans watching Sunday's Super Bowl can count on seeing long passes, big tackles and dramatic running plays. They should not see a player lying prone on the field after the sickening crack of a helmet-to-helmet hit, thanks to an NFL effort to reduce player concussions.

NFL: Concussions drop 13 pct but work far from over

The National Football League said Thursday that the number of concussions suffered in games and practices -- a major health concern for players -- dropped 13 percent in 2013 from the year before. But officials admitted that much more remains to be done to reduce the number of traumatic head injuries in the sport. Figures released three days before the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos meet in Super Bowl 48 show concussions in pre-season and regular season games and practices fell from 261 in 2012 to 228 for the 2013 season.

NFL: Concussions drop 13 pct but work far from over

The National Football League said Thursday that the number of concussions suffered in games and practices -- a major health concern for players -- dropped 13 percent in 2013 from the year before. But officials admitted that much more remains to be done to reduce the number of traumatic head injuries in the sport. Figures released three days before the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos meet in Super Bowl 48 show concussions in pre-season and regular season games and practices fell from 261 in 2012 to 228 for the 2013 season.

Brain injury survivors three times as likely to die early

People who survive traumatic brain injuries are three times as likely as the general population to die early, often from suicide or fatal injury, said a British-led study Wednesday. The findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Psychiatry suggest a need for longer term care and follow-up of the millions of people who suffer these injuries each year. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be caused by a blow to the head that results in skull fracture, internal bleeding, loss of consciousness for over an hour or a combination of these, said the report.

U.S. judge rejects $760 million NFL concussion settlement

By Scott Malone (Reuters) - A $760 million settlement between the National Football League and thousands of former players, who contend the league downplayed the risk of concussions, was rejected on Tuesday by a U.S. judge who said it might not be enough to pay all of the affected players. The proposed deal, reached in August, had set aside up to $5 million for each former player diagnosed with a certain brain condition as a result of their years on the playing field.

Ex-NFL players could get $5 million each in concussion settlement: lawyers

By Daniel Lovering BOSTON (Reuters) - Former National Football League players suffering from health problems will be eligible to receive as much as $5 million each under a settlement reached in a lawsuit brought by thousands of retired players. The ex-NFL players will not have to show their injuries were caused by football, Christopher Seeger, an attorney for the retired players, said on Tuesday, a day after filing a preliminary motion for approval of the settlement in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Brain rest after concussion linked to quicker recovery

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Most U.S. health authorities recommend people who've suffered a concussion give their brain a break while they recover, but there hadn't been strong data to support that. A new study provides some of the first evidence showing "cognitive rest" does make a difference. Disagreements over whether resting the brain really aids recovery have "generated controversy," Dr. William P. Meehan III, director of the Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention in Waltham, Massachusetts, said.

Talk and die: The invisible threat from brain injuries

Blows to the head can be silent killers for which swift diagnosis is often the only recourse, say doctors. Even if there is no damage to the outside of the head, the impact may inflict catastrophic damage to the brain inside, they say. Because a shock that smashes the brain, a 1.3-kilo (2.8-pound) organ with the consistency of soft jelly, against the hard protective shell of the skull, can damage nerves, brain cells and blood vessels.

High chairs send U.S. kids to ER every hour: study

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Every hour, on average, a child ends up in a U.S. emergency room with an injury associated with a high chair, according to a new study. And the risk seems to be rising. Each year between 2003 and 2010, an average of about 9,500 infants and toddlers came to U.S. emergency rooms with high-chair-related injuries. Injuries increased, however, toward the end of that eight-year period.

St. Louis Rams - PlayerWatch

QB Brady Quinn was placed on injured reserve Saturday because of a back problem. CB Cortland Finnegan was placed on injured reserve Saturday because of an orbital fracture in his eye. Finnegan suffered the injury in Week 4 against San Francisco, and after missing some time, tried to come back and play. During the bye week, he got a second opinion and it was recommended he not play for the rest of the season. He is expected to have surgery in early December.
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