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Tennis: Extreme heat forces rare Aussie Open suspension

Extreme heat forced organisers to suspend play for several hours at the Australian Open Thursday, following days of complaints about "inhumane" conditions which left some players fainting and vomiting. With temperatures hitting 42 Celsius (107.6 Fahrenheit), officials finally called a halt just before 2:00 pm (0300 GMT), hauling players off courts and closing the roofs on the two main arenas. The rare shutdown was the first in five years and follows near-record heat in Melbourne which buckled tramlines and prompted 1,000 bushfires in the surrounding state.

Hotter longer, Australian heat wave pressuring commodities

By Matt Siegel and Colin Packham SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia can expect even longer and hotter heat waves than the one now scorching wide swathes of the country, a climate research group said on Thursday, raising questions about its long-term position as an agricultural powerhouse. A blistering heat wave has settled over Australia's south and southeast for nearly a week, with soaring temperatures causing worry after players and fans alike collapsed at the Australian Open Tennis Tournament in Melbourne.

Tennis: Extreme heat forces rare Aussie Open suspension

Extreme heat forced organisers to suspend play for several hours at the Australian Open Thursday following days of complaints about "inhumane" conditions which left some players fainting and vomiting. With temperatures hitting 42 Celsius (107.6 Fahrenheit), officials finally called a halt just before 2:00 pm (0300 GMT), hauling players off courts and closing the roofs on the two main arenas. The rare shutdown was the first in five years and follows near-record heat in Melbourne which buckled tramlines and prompted 1,000 bushfires in the surrounding state.

Worst yet to come in Australia heatwave

Australians sweltering through an extreme heatwave were warned that the worst was yet to come Thursday, with hundreds of fires raging in several states and temperatures nearing record highs. Most of southeast Australia has been in the grips of a scorching heatwave that triggered a devastating wildfire on the west coast, razing 55 homes and claiming one life on Sunday.

Tennis: It's the Australian Oven as temperatures soar

A ball boy collapsed and water bottles melted on court as the world's top tennis players struggled in extreme heat which soared towards record levels at the Australian Open Tuesday. Players draped themselves in ice towels and guzzled water on the changeovers with the thermometer hitting 40.5 Celsius (104.9 Fahrenheit) by early afternoon. "It felt pretty hot, like you're dancing in a frying pan or something like that," said defending women's champion Victoria Azarenka. "I don't think anybody wants to go outdoors right now."

One dead as Australian blaze razes around 50 homes

A man died and some 50 homes were razed after a fast-moving wildfire swept through the outskirts of western Australia's Perth, officials said Monday. The blaze, thought to have been started by a fallen power line in the city's wooded fringes on Sunday, was fanned by hot, strong gusts that saw 20-metre (66-foot) flames tear through residential streets. Fire and emergency authorities said 49 homes had been confirmed lost but warned that some 30 percent of the fire zone still needed to be searched and damage reports could increase.

One dead as Australian blaze razes around 50 homes

A man died and some 50 homes were razed after a fast-moving wildfire swept through the outskirts of western Australia's Perth, officials said Monday. The blaze, thought to have been started by a fallen power line in the city's wooded fringes on Sunday, was fanned by hot, strong gusts that saw 20-metre (66-foot) flames tear through residential streets. Fire and emergency authorities said 49 homes had been confirmed lost but warned that some 30 percent of the fire zone was still needed to be searched and damage reports could increase.

One dead, four missing as Australian blaze razes homes

A man died and four other people were missing after a fast-moving wildfire destroyed at least 46 homes in western Australia's Perth, officials said Monday. The blaze, thought to have been started by a fallen power line in the city's wooded outskirts on Sunday, was fanned by hot, strong gusts that saw 20-metre (66-foot) flames tear through residential streets. "It has been confirmed that 46 homes have been lost," Western Australia state's fire and emergency services department said, warning that some 30 percent of the fire zone was yet to be assessed.

Thousands without power as heat wave hits Argentina

Buenos Aires, Dec 22 (EFE).- In the midst of a heat wave, thousands of Argentines living in the capital's metropolitan area on Sunday are still without power, while demand for electricity keeps growing and reaching peak levels, the Federal Planning Ministry said. The Argentine power grid set a new record for electricity demand on a Saturday when the consumption level reached 20.605 megawatts, the ministry said in a statement. The new record exceeds the old one set last week, when power demand peaked at 20.287 MW.

Climate change drives up risk of bushfire in Australia: report

Climate change drives up risk of bushfire in Australia: report CANBERRA, Dec. 9 (Xinhua) -- Australia has always experienced bushfires but climate change is driving up the risk of fire danger weather, a new Bushfire Report from the Climate Council, an independent organization, warned on Monday.
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