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10 pharmaceutical giants join US research initiative

Government researchers will collaborate with 10 large pharmaceutical companies on a $230 million initiative to speed development of new medications for major diseases, the US National Institutes of Health announced Tuesday. The five-year initiative targets Alzheimer's Disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and may be expanded to other ailments, the NIH said. The goal is to pool resources among NIH and the companies, normally vigorous competitors, to enable analysis of large data sets to track disease progression and the effect of therapies.

10 pharmaceutical giants join US research initiative

Government researchers will collaborate with 10 large pharmaceutical companies on a $230 million initiative to speed development of new medications for major diseases, the US National Institutes of Health announced Tuesday. The five-year initiative targets Alzheimer's Disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and may be expanded to other ailments, the NIH said. The goal is to pool resources among NIH and the companies, normally vigorous competitors, to enable analysis of large data sets to track disease progression and the effect of therapies.

Medical trials for kids don't always match global need

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Research trials that evaluate drugs and other treatments for children don't always align with needs around the world, according to a new analysis. Researchers compared trials registered on a U.S. government website to the burden of 21 diseases found in countries around the world. They found that what was being researched was only moderately tied to what trials are needed.

U.S. Nobel laureates worry about future of basic science

By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - The kind of basic science that helped Randy Schekman win the coveted Nobel medicine prize might never have been funded if he had applied today. Schekman, along with two other U.S.-based winners of the 2013 medicine prize, Thomas Suedhof and James Rothman, slammed recent spending cuts at the National Institutes of Health, the biggest funder of scientific research in the world. The budget curbs were undermining the chances of breakthroughs and the next generation of basic research, they said.

Spanish brain-mapping pioneer gets U.S. grant

Washington, Oct 2 (EFE).- Spaniard Rafael Yuste, a professor of biological science and neuroscience at Columbia University, was selected to receive a $2.5 million grant from the U.S. National Institutes of Health for his research aimed at mapping the brain. Yuste is among the 12 recipients of the 2013 NIH Pioneer Award. The grants are part of NIH's program to support and encourage what the institutes describe as high-risk, high-reward research.

U.S. to cut use of chimps in medical research sharply

Washington, Jun 27 (EFE).- The number of chimpanzees used in biomedical research in the United States will be reduced sharply because technological advances have made their use unnecessary, the National Institutes of Health, or NIH, said. "Americans have benefitted greatly from the chimpanzees' service to biomedical research, but new scientific methods and technologies have rendered their use in research largely unnecessary," NIH director Francis Collins said in a statement.

US says will retire most research chimps

The US government said Wednesday it will send most of its 360 research chimpanzees into retirement but will keep a small colony of about 50 for possible future studies on vaccines and behavior. The National Institutes of Health announced after more than two years of examination it was accepting most of the recommendations of independent experts to phase out the bulk of biomedical research using the primates.

The best place to work after age 50? NIH, says AARP

By Mark Miller CHICAGO (Reuters) - Phil Lenowitz works in Bethesda, Maryland, but a year ago he moved to Asheville, North Carolina. At age 63, Lenowitz spends three weeks each month in Bethesda, where he is deputy director of human resources at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and one week in Asheville with his wife Peggy, 62. Lenowitz is on track to retire in Asheville - somewhere down the road. The current split schedule hasn't caused any friction at work.

Science and research hit hard by US sequester cuts

Automatic spending cuts have hit America's science and research sectors especially hard, according to experts, who warn of potentially dire implications for the nation's overall competitiveness. As the "sequester," a package of spending cuts imposed last month, begins to pinch, many research projects will be slowed or scuttled, from cancer therapies to efforts to convert medical breakthroughs into marketable therapies.

UPDATE 1-US high court won't review federal embryonic stem cell funds

By Terry Baynes Jan 7 (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review a challenge to federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research brought by two researchers who said the U.S. National Institutes of Health rules on such studies violate federal law.
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