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Briton 'global exporter of terrorism' NY trial hears

British hate preacher Abu Hamza was a "global exporter" of violence and terrorism intent on waging war against non-Muslims, prosecutors said Thursday as the Egyptian-born cleric's trial opened in New York. Mustafa Kamel Mustafa, 56, better known in Britain as Abu Hamza al-Masri, has pleaded not guilty to 11 kidnapping and terror charges which predate the 9/11 attacks. He faces the rest of his life in a maximum security US prison if convicted. He is blind in one eye and lost both arms, blown off above the elbow, in an explosion in Afghanistan years ago.

Canada FM concerned about Egypt's Brotherhood

Canada on Thursday expressed concern about the Muslim Brotherhood, the target of a relentless crackdown by Egypt's military-installed authorities since the army ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July. "Canada has taken an aggressive stand when it comes to listings (of terror groups)... but there is a certain process," Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird said at a news conference in Cairo. "We are tremendously concerned about the Muslim Brotherhood... but the listings are made on the basis of facts and intel."

Canada FM concerned about Egypt's Brotherhood

Canada on Thursday expressed concern about the Muslim Brotherhood, the target of a relentless crackdown by Egypt's military-installed authorities since the army ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July. "Canada has taken an aggressive stand when it comes to listings (of terror groups)... but there is a certain process," Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird said at a news conference in Cairo. "We are tremendously concerned about the Muslim Brotherhood... but the listings are made on the basis of facts and intel."

NY trial of British radical hears opening arguments

To US government prosecutors, British hate preacher Abu Hamza was a global exporter of terrorism. To his defense lawyers, the armless radical is guilty only of harboring unsavoury opinions. A Manhattan federal court heard Thursday opening arguments in the trial of the 56-year-old Abu Hamza, accused of 11 kidnapping and terror charges that predate the 9/11 attacks. Mustafa Kamel Mustafa, better known in Britain as Abu Hamza al-Masri, has pleaded not guilty but faces the rest of his life in a maximum security US prison if convicted.

Teen in 'Jihad Jane' case sentenced to five years in prison

By Daniel Kelley PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) - A Pakistani immigrant who is the youngest person ever convicted of U.S. terror charges was sentenced to five years in prison on Thursday by a federal judge after pleading guilty to taking part in a plot to kill a Swedish artist.

Growing jihadist threat in Tunisia border area

Tunisia faces a growing jihadist threat in the mountainous region near the border with Algeria where several soldiers have been killed battling militant Islamists, the defence ministry said on Thursday. The presidency on Wednesday declared Mount Chaambi, as well as some surrounding areas including the mountains of Sammama, Salloum and Mghilla, "zones closed for military operations".

Libyan Qaeda suspect deprived rights in US jail

The Libyan Al-Qaeda suspect captured last year outside his home in Tripoli is being deprived legal documents and personal effects in a US prison hospital, his lawyer said Wednesday. Anas al-Libi, 50, has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy charges over the 1998 Al-Qaeda bombings of US embassies in East Africa that killed 244 people and wounded more than 5,000 others. He was detained by US commandos in the Libyan capital in October and brought to New York, where he was indicted in 2000 to face trial after being interrogated on board a US warship.

Yemen's al Qaeda leader vows to attack America in new video

By Yara Bayoumy DUBAI (Reuters) - The leader of al Qaeda's wing in Yemen has vowed to attack the United States, in a video apparently showing a gathering of the group celebrating a mass jailbreak of fighters. In February, attackers mounted a bomb, grenade and gun assault on the main prison in Sanaa in which 29 inmates, including 19 jailed for terrorism-related crimes, escaped.

Pakistani Taliban end ceasefire with government but say talks still on

By Saud Mehsud DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan (Reuters) - The Pakistani Taliban have formally ended a 40-day ceasefire but are still open to talks with the government, a spokesman said on Wednesday. Shahidullah Shahid said the insurgents were not extending the ceasefire, which began on March 1, because the government had continued to arrest people and had killed more than 50 people associated with them.

Pakistani Taliban refuse to extend ceasefire, will continue talks

The Pakistani Taliban Wednesday said they would not extend a ceasefire called to help peace negotiations with the government, but insisted they were still committed to the talks process. The Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) announced a one-month ceasefire at the start of March as the government sought a negotiated end to their bloody seven-year insurgency. The TTP extended the ceasefire to April 10, but complained there had been "complete silence" from the government since then and hinted that the military was trying to thwart talks.
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