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Year after MP's murder, Tunisia turmoil slowly abating

The assassination of prominent Tunisian opposition figure Chokri Belaid a year ago Thursday ignited a crisis which is only now starting to ease following the adoption of a new constitution. On February 6, 2013, Tunisians were stunned to learn of the death of the 48-year-old lawyer and leftist politician who had been a fierce critic of Ennahda, the Islamist party that rose to power after the first Arab Spring uprising toppled a long-ruling dictator.

Security forces battle gunmen in Tunis suburb

Tunisian security forces on Monday traded gunfire with presumed Islamist militants in a suburb of the capital, the interior ministry said. "Special units of the National Guard have surrounded a house where a terrorist group is located," in the Raoued area, ministry spokesman Mohamed Ali Laroui told reporters. "There was an exchange of fire, and efforts have been made to try and take them alive... (but) they don't won't to give themselves up," he said, adding that there were at least three militants inside.

Obama invites new Tunisian leader to U.S.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Monday invited Tunisian Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa to visit Washington, days after a new Tunisian government replaced the Islamist party that took power after a 2011 uprising. Obama, in a phone call to Jomaa, congratulated him on the ratification of a new constitution and the inauguration of his caretaker government.

Tunisia central bank 'optimistic' after IMF agrees loan

Tunisia's central bank expressed "optimism" Thursday after the IMF released a delayed $506 million loan to support the fragile economy following major steps this week to end months of political turmoil. The loan, part of a two-year, $1.76 billion (1.3 billion euro) package agreed last year, was approved by the International Monetary Fund on Wednesday after the new caretaker government of technocrat Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa was sworn in.

Kerry calls for swift elections in Tunisia

US Secretary of State John Kerry Wednesday urged Tunisia's new government of independents to organize elections swiftly as the next step in the country's democratic transition. The new leadership, which replaces the Islamist-led administration, took the oath of office Wednesday and is tasked with steering the country towards democracy. Kerry said the new government and the adoption of a new constitution were a "historic milestone in Tunisia's democratic transition" three years after the Arab Spring revolution.

Kerry calls for swift elections in Tunisia

US Secretary of State John Kerry Wednesday urged Tunisia's new government of independents to organize elections swiftly as the next step in the country's democratic transition. The new leadership, which replaces the Islamist-led administration, took the oath of office Wednesday and is tasked with steering the country towards democracy. Kerry said the new government and the adoption of a new constitution were a "historic milestone in Tunisia's democratic transition" three years after the Arab Spring revolution.

Tunisia's new government of independents sworn in

Tunisia's new technocratic government headed by Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa was sworn in Wednesday, replacing an Islamist-led administration under an accord to end political turmoil and prepare for fresh elections. The formal transfer of power took place at the presidential palace after a marathon overnight parliamentary session in which 149 of the country's 193 lawmakers finally approved Jomaa's line-up. The new ministers took the oath of office in front of President Moncef Marzouki at a ceremony also attended by members of the former cabinet.

Tunisia's new government of independents sworn in

Tunisia's new technocratic government headed by Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa was sworn in Wednesday, replacing an Islamist-led administration under an accord to end political turmoil and prepare for fresh elections. The formal transfer of power took place at the presidential palace after a marathon overnight parliamentary session in which 149 of the country's 193 lawmakers finally approved Jomaa's line-up. The new ministers took the oath of office in front of President Moncef Marzouki at a ceremony also attended by members of the former cabinet.

Tunisia parliament approves new cabinet line-up

Tunisia's parliament on Wednesday approved a technocratic caretaker government tasked with leading the country out of a bruising political crisis and to fresh elections. After a marathon session broadcast live on national television, the line-up proposed by Prime Minister-designate Mehdi Jomaa was approved by 149 lawmakers, with 20 voting against and 24 abstaining.

Tunisia parliament approves new cabinet line-up

Tunisia's parliament on Wednesday approved a technocratic caretaker government tasked with leading the country out of a bruising political crisis and into fresh elections. After a marathon session broadcast live on national television, the line-up proposed by Prime Minister-designate Mehdi Jomaa was approved by 149 lawmakers, with 20 voting against and 24 abstaining.
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