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Kurd rebels warn Ankara against 'provocations' during pullout

Kurdish rebel leaders have confirmed that their fighters will begin withdrawing from Turkey into bases in neighbouring Iraq on Wednesday and warned Ankara against "provocations and clashes" which could hamper their retreat. "Our guerrilla forces will take action for starting the pullout process" on Wednesday, the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) command said in a statement carried by the pro-Kurdish Firat news agency on Tuesday. But the statement claimed: "Constant surveillance flights of the unmanned aerial vehicles are delaying the withdrawal process."

Kurdish rebels confirm Turkey pullout to begin Wednesday

Kurdish rebel leaders have confirmed that their fighters will begin withdrawing from Turkey into bases in neighbouring Iraq on Wednesday, the pro-Kurdish Firat news agency reported. "Our guerrilla forces will take action for starting the pullout process as of May 8, 2013," the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) command said in a statement carried by Firat on Tuesday. The first batch of rebels will return to their bases in northern Iraq in a week's time, according to the PKK. "This process will continue in a planned and organised way."

Timeline - Kurdish militant group PKK's three-decade war with Turkey

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - The Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) militant group will start a withdrawal from Turkish territory in May, advancing a peace process meant to end a three-decade conflict. Below is a list of key dates and landmark moments. 1978: Abdullah Ocalan, a student at Ankara University, forms PKK as a clandestine Marxist group. August 1984: PKK stages first attacks in southeast Turkey, killing two soldiers. Fighting escalates in the following years, the PKK using bases in northern Iraq as refuge.

Kurdish rebels to begin withdrawal from Turkey on May 8

Kurdish rebels announced on Thursday they would on May 8 begin withdrawing from Turkey into their safe haven in northern Iraq amid a peace drive between Ankara and the rebel movement. "As part of ongoing preparations, the withdrawal will begin on May 8, 2013," Murat Karayilan, the leader of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), was quoted as saying by the pro-Kurdish Firat news agency. "The withdrawal is planned in phases ... and is aimed to be finalised as soon as possible."

Kurdish militants to begin withdrawal from Turkey in May

By Murad Jambaz QANDIL MOUNTAINS, Iraq (Reuters) - Rebel Kurdish field commander Murat Karayilan ordered his fighters to begin withdrawing from Turkish soil within two weeks and rebase in the mountains of northern Iraq as part of a peace plan with Ankara to end a three-decades-old conflict. The pullout, negotiated by Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) chief Abdullah Ocalan jailed on a prison island near Istanbul, offers the best chance yet of settlement of a war that has killed over 40,000 and battered the Turkish economy.

Hizbullah-PKK clashes

When the peace process began there was immediately a question in everyone's mind: How could this process possibly be sabotaged? The possibility that first came to mind was that a group within the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) or the government may sabotage it. The second pertinent possibility was that states like Iran or Syria, using either the activities of the PKK itself or other proxy groups would have the chance to interfere.Until last week the peace process progressed without problem.

What did you give the PKK?

Those who are opposed to the solution process for some political reasons are now asking this question more frequently: A solution is fine, but what did you give the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) in return for the withdrawal of its armed groups from Turkey and the end of an armed struggle against Turkey?Naturally, the government and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan should respond to this question.

Senior Kurd says hard for rebels to disarm before leaving Turkey

By Alexandra Hudson and Gareth Jones BERLIN (Reuters) - A top Kurdish politician said on Monday it would be difficult for Kurdish fighters to disarm before leaving Turkey under a peace process, stressing that the key issue was that they depart peacefully without contact with the Turkish military. Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's government is seeking a weapons-free pullout by militants of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) as part of a drive to end a three-decades long conflict which has killed more than 40,000 people.

The long-distance handshake

Everything has gone as planned so far. Well, mostly. On his way to Bishkek, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan talked vaguely about “some minor disturbances.” He most probably had the clashes at Dicle University in mind, where a violent scene caused concern.What is going fine is the process itself as a whole.

Moody's: Settlement process positive for Turkey's credit rating

Credit rating agency Moody's has said that a settlement process between Turkey and the terrorist Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) is a positive development for the country's credit rating.In a statement released on Thursday, Moody's, which is the only agency that hasn't raised Turkey's credit rating in recent months, said that the process will also increase the country's attractiveness for foreign investors.
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