Connect to share and comment

Brazil 'going well and will go better'

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said Saturday that her country was "going well and will go better," after Standard & Poor's cut Brazil's rating to the lowest level for investment grade debt. "We are convinced of the absolute necessity of preserving the soundness of the macroeconomic fundamentals of the country," the president told an annual meeting of the Inter-American Development Bank at a resort in the northeast state of Bahia.

Support for Brazil president drops ahead of October vote

By Paulo Prada RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Popular support for Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has faltered ahead of October's presidential election, a poll showed Thursday, although she remains a favorite to win a second term. With a sluggish economy, high inflation and a scandal surrounding Brazil's state-run oil company, Rousseff's personal approval rating has fallen to 51 percent from 56 percent in November, the survey by the Ibope polling institute and Brazil's National Industry Confederation showed.

Support for Brazil president drops ahead of October vote

By Paulo Prada RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Popular support for Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has faltered ahead of October's presidential election, a poll showed Thursday, although she remains a favorite to win a second term. With a sluggish economy, high inflation and a scandal surrounding Brazil's state-run oil company, Rousseff's personal approval rating has fallen to 51 percent from 56 percent in November, the survey by the Ibope polling institute and Brazil's National Industry Confederation showed.

Brazil troops enter Rio favela

Brazilian reconnaissance troops entered a sprawling slum district near Rio's international airport early Wednesday ahead of a larger operation to secure the crime-ridden area ahead of the World Cup. The federal troops joined police in the deployment in Mare to set the stage for a major joint drive to "pacify" a cluster of 16 neighborhoods home to around 130,000 people and seen as havens for organized crime.

Brazil troops enter Rio favela

Brazilian reconnaissance troops entered a sprawling slum district near Rio's international airport early Wednesday ahead of a larger operation to secure the crime-ridden area ahead of the World Cup. The federal troops joined police in the deployment in Mare to set the stage for a major joint drive to "pacify" a cluster of 16 neighborhoods home to around 130,000 people and seen as havens for organized crime. Rio authorities last week asked the government to approve military support for police in favelas after a series of attacks on police units.

Brazil troops enter Rio favela

Brazilian reconnaissance troops entered a sprawling slum district near Rio's international airport early Wednesday ahead of a larger operation to secure the crime-ridden area ahead of the World Cup. The federal troops joined police in the deployment in Mare to set the stage for a major joint drive to "pacify" a cluster of 16 neighborhoods seen as havens for organized crime. Rio authorities last week asked the government to approve military support for police in favelas in thrall to violent gangs and drug traffickers after a series of attacks on police units.

Brazil scrambles to avoid power rationing as costs soar

By Jeb Blount RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Brazil is fighting against time to avoid crippling power blackouts and electricity rationing as a drought prevents the world's most water-rich nation from recharging its hydroelectric dams. While a decade of growth has diversified the electricity system away from hydropower, reducing dependence on the weather, policymakers, industrial companies and investors in the world's seventh-largest economy may find little cause to relax.

Brazil to send troops to Rio for World Cup security

Brazil will deploy the military in slums near Rio's international airport to back up police as the city braces for the arrival of hundreds of thousands of tourists for the World Cup, authorities said Monday. Justice Minister Eduard Cardozo announced the reinforcements, without giving troop numbers nor the start date for the operation. "The federal government supports the Rio government in this battle with armed crime," said Cardozo.

Brazilian army to occupy crime-ridden shantytowns in Rio, gov't says

Rio de Janeiro, Mar 24 (EFE).- The Brazilian government said Monday, 80 days before the start of the 2014 World Cup, that the military will help occupy several "favelas," or shantytowns, in Rio de Janeiro to guarantee security in an area currently controlled by violent drug trafficking outfits where some 100,000 people live. The use of the armed forces and the National Security Force to occupy the Mare favelas was announced Monday at a press conference by Justice Minister Jose Eduardo Cardozo after a meeting with Rio de Janeiro state Gov. Sergio Cabral.

Brazil to send troops to Rio for World Cup security

Brazil will deploy the military in slums near Rio's international airport to back up police as the city braces for the arrival of hundreds of thousands of tourists for the World Cup, authorities said Monday. Justice Minister Eduard Cardozo announced the reinforcements, without giving troop numbers nor the start date for the operation. "The federal government supports the Rio government in this battle with armed crime," said Cardozo.
Syndicate content