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U.N. inquiry chief wants North Korea hauled before international court

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The chief U.N. investigator into human rights abuses in North Korea appealed to the U.N. Security Council on Thursday to refer the situation in the reclusive Asian state to the International Criminal Court for prosecution.

Call for sanctions against N. Korea over abuses

The United Nations Security Council should slap targeted sanctions on North Korean officials responsible for grave human rights abuses, the head of a special UN inquiry said Thursday. Michael Kirby told an informal meeting of the Security Council convened by Australia, France and the United States that he also wanted the reclusive regime hauled before the International Criminal Court (ICC) for prosecution.

Call for sanctions against N.Korea over abuses

The United Nations Security Council should slap targeted sanctions on North Korean officials responsible for grave human rights abuses, the head of a special UN inquiry said Thursday. "More monitoring and engagement alone cannot suffice in the face of crimes that shock the conscience of humanity," Michael Kirby said in New York at an informal meeting of the Security Council convened by the United States, France and Australia. North Korea did not send a representative.

Judge orders information on CIA secret prisons

A military judge at Guantanamo Bay has ordered the US government to turn over information on secret CIA interrogation centers connected to the trial of the alleged mastermind of the 2000 USS Cole bombing. Judge James Pohl instructed the government to reveal names, dates and locations of "black sites" where Saudi suspect Abd Rahim al-Nashiri was held between his arrest in 2002 and his transfer to the notorious Guantanamo detention center in 2006. Pohl's order was first reported by the Miami Herald newspaper.

Torture 'routinely' used in Syria: UN rights chief

The UN's human rights chief on Monday condemned the "routine" use of torture in Syrian detention facilities, as a new report said victims were raped, beaten and had their teeth and toenails pulled out. "Our findings confirm that torture is being routinely used in government detention facilities in Syria, and that torture is also used by some armed groups," UN High Commissioner Navi Pillay said.

Torture 'routinely' used in Syria: UN rights chief

The UN's human rights chief on Monday condemned the "routine" use of torture in Syrian detention facilities, as a new report said victims were raped, beaten and had their teeth and toenails pulled out. Navi Pillay said torture was routinely used in government detention facilities as well as by some armed groups in Syria, where more than 150,000 people have been killed in a bloody civil war. "In armed conflict, torture constitutes a war crime," said the UN rights commissioner.

China human rights lawyer tells of torture at hands of police

A 45-year-old human rights lawyer who has spent many years concerned with the issue of China's so-called "black jails" where citizens are subjected to human rights violations was severely beaten by guards while recently detained, it was learned by Saturday. Tang Jitian, who was released last Sunday, told Kyodo News in Beijing of the violence he was subjected to, such as being physically assaulted at a police station in the northern province of Heilongjiang while facing such threats as having his kidneys removed alive.

Croatia to compensate journalist over secret services abuse

A Croatian court has ordered the state to pay a journalist 17,000 euros ($23,000) in damages over an abusive interrogation by intelligence agents. After an eight-year trial that shook up the country's intelligence services, the court ruled agents had violated journalist Helena Puljiz's rights when they took her in for unauthorised questioning in 2004, threatening her, blackmailing her and demanding she cooperate with them.

Senate panel votes to release CIA interrogation report

The Senate Intelligence Committee voted 11-3 Thursday to release hundreds of pages of its classified report on "brutal" CIA interrogations which details one of the most unsavory periods in the agency's history. The move allows Senator Dianne Feinstein, the panel's chair, to send the 400-page executive summary -- which sharply criticizes the CIA's controversial Bush-era interrogation program -- to the White House for review.

CIA misled public on interrogation program, newspaper reports

(Reuters) - The Central Intelligence Agency misled the U.S. government and public for years about aspects of its brutal interrogation program, concealing details about harsh treatment of detainees and other issues, according to a report in the Washington Post. U.S. officials who have seen a Senate Intelligence Committee report on the CIA interrogation program described damning new information about a network of secret detention facilities, also called "black sites", the Washington Post said.
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