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Uruguay agrees to take Guantanamo detainees

Uruguay's President Jose Mujica said Thursday that his country had agreed to receive detainees from the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, calling the decision a matter of human rights. US President Barack Obama is struggling to fulfill his five-year-old promise to close the controversial jail, and countries have been slow to come forward and agree to accept transferred inmates. Uruguay would be the first country in South America to do so.

Afghanistan frees 77 prisoners despite UK, coalition warning

By Jessica Donati and Mirwais Harooni KABUL (Reuters) - Afghanistan on Thursday freed 77 prisoners captured by foreign troops, despite opposition from Britain and NATO-led forces which said they could pose a security threat. Afghan President Hamid Karzai's government has long complained that foreign forces have locked up many Afghans on dubious grounds and with no proper judicial process. A similar release last month caused tension with the United States.

U.S. in talks with Uruguay over Guantanamo prisoners

MONTEVIDEO (Reuters) - The United States has held talks with Uruguay about closing the Guantanamo prison, the embassy in Montevideo said on Thursday, following a newspaper report the small South American nation has agreed to take five of the detainees the U.S. wants to relocate. Weekly newspaper Busqueda reported Uruguay accepted a U.S. proposal to take the detainees for two years, after President Jose Mujica, a 78-year-old ex-guerrilla, spoke to Cuban President Raul Castro and sent delegates to the prison.

Uruguay agrees to receive five Guantanamo detainees

Uruguay said Thursday it had agreed to receive five prisoners of as yet undisclosed nationalities from the US war on terror prison camp in Guantanamo Bay. US President Barack Obama is struggling to fulfill his five-year-old promise to close the controversial jail, and countries have been slow to come forward and agree to accept transferred inmates. Confirming a report first published in the weekly Busqueda newspaper, a high-level government source told AFP that Uruguay will host the former inmates for at least two years.

Uruguay to accept five Guantanamo detainees at US request

Uruguay said Thursday it agreed to take five prisoners from Guantanamo, as US President Barack Obama works to fulfill his years-old promise to close the controversial jail for terror suspects. Confirming the report first published in the weekly Busqueda newspaper, a high-level government source told AFP Uruguay will host the former inmates for at least two years.

FBI evaluating complaints about hacking by CIA, Senate panel: sources

By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The FBI is evaluating separate criminal referrals sent to the Justice Department by the CIA in its dispute with Senate investigators over access to documents about the agency's "enhanced interrogation" practices, officials familiar with the matter said.

War crimes evidence in Syria solid enough for indictment: U.N.

By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - U.N. investigators said on Tuesday they had expanded their list of suspected war criminals from both sides in Syria's civil war and the evidence was solid enough to prepare any indictment. The U.N. inquiry has identified individuals, military units and security agencies as well as insurgent groups suspected of committing abuses such as torture and bombing civilian areas, it said in its report to the United Nations Human Rights Council.

N.Korea crimes on par with Nazis, Khmer Rouge: UN probe

The crimes of North Korea's regime are as chilling as those of the Nazis, South Africa's apartheid regime or Cambodia's Khmer Rouge and must be stopped, the head of a UN inquiry said Monday. "Contending with the great scourges of Nazism, apartheid, the Khmer Rouge and other affronts required courage by great nations and ordinary human beings alike," Michael Kirby told the UN Human Rights Council. "It is now your solemn duty to address the scourge of human rights violations and crimes against humanity in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea," he said.

Unsettled legacy of torture looms over CIA-Congress feud

A now-defunct US program that used harsh interrogation techniques against terror suspects still casts a shadow over Washington, with the CIA and Congress locked in a bitter dispute over its legacy. Launched in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks by ex-president George W. Bush, the "detention and interrogation program" was designed to force captured suspects to talk about Al-Qaeda's plots against America.

US transfers Guantanamo detainee to Algeria

The Pentagon said Thursday it had transferred an inmate from the Guantanamo prison back home to Algeria, after holding him at the facility for 12 years without a trial. The move brought the number of detainees at the military prison down to 154, as President Barack Obama tries to make good on a promise to close the controversial detention camp at a US naval base in southeast Cuba. Ahmed Belbacha, 44, was cleared for transfer by a task force created to review inmates' cases by a 2009 executive order, the Pentagon said in a statement.
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