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Supreme Court ruling eases police search of suspect's home

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Supreme Court on Tuesday handed a victory to law enforcement agencies by making it easier for police to search a dwelling without a warrant. The court held on a 6-3 vote that police can search a home without a warrant, even if the suspect has objected, as long as he is no longer on the scene and a co-tenant gives consent.

New York City, rights group seal deal to end stop-and-frisk

By Marina Lopes and Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York City's new mayor on Thursday announced a settlement with a civil liberties group that sued the city over its stop-and-frisk practices, which he fiercely challenged as a candidate, paving the way for court-ordered reforms to take effect. A federal judge found the New York Police Department practices unconstitutional in August.

New York City ends legal defense of stop-and-frisk police tactic

By Joseph Ax and Marina Lopes NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who ran on a pledge to reform the police department's aggressive use of stop-and-frisk practices, reached a deal with a civil liberties group on Thursday to end the long legal fight. Last August, a federal court judge found the New York police department's practices unconstitutional. That decision was appealed by then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who argued the tactic was instrumental in the city's historic drop in violent crime.

Older phones shouldn't get same protection from searches as smartphones: Crown

VANCOUVER - Recent changes in the law requiring police to obtain search warrants before examining the contents of smartphones shouldn't apply to older, less-advanced cellphones, a Crown lawyer told British Columbia's highest court Tuesday. The B.C. Court of Appeal is examining whether it was legal for the RCMP to search two BlackBerry phones seized from a suspect following a 2006 kidnapping in Richmond, near Vancouver.

Police should need warrant to search cellphones after arrest: lawyer

VANCOUVER - Police should be required to obtain a search warrant before combing through the text messages, emails and other data on a suspect's smartphone after arrest, a defence lawyer told British Columbia's highest court on Monday. The B.C. Appeal Court case, involving a kidnapping nearly eight years ago, is the latest to consider when police should be able to search the vast amounts of private information stored on modern-day cellphones.

U.S. Supreme Court to weigh cell phone searches by police

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on Friday to decide whether police can search an arrested criminal suspect's cell phone without a warrant in two cases that showcase how the courts are wrestling to keep up with rapid technological advances.

U.S. Supreme Court to weigh cell phone searches by police

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on Friday to decide whether police can search an arrested criminal suspect's cell phone without a warrant in two cases that showcase how the courts are wrestling to keep up with rapid technological advances.

Legal clash in the digital age: Can police search an arrestee's cellphone without a warrant?

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court decided 40 years ago that police don't need a search warrant to look through anything a person is carrying when arrested. But that was long before smartphones gave people the ability to take with them the equivalent of millions of pages of documents or thousands of photographs. In a new clash over technology and privacy, the court is being asked to resolve divisions among federal and state courts over whether the old rules should still apply in the digital age.

NY judge throws out suit by photographers challenging border searches of laptops

NEW YORK, N.Y. - A New York City judge has thrown out a lawsuit by a photojournalism organization and others challenging laptop computer searches at U.S. borders. Judge Edward Korman granted the government's motion to dismiss the lawsuit on Tuesday. Civil rights lawyers had sued in Brooklyn federal court in 2010 on behalf of the National Press Photographers Association, criminal defence lawyers and a French-American student whose laptop was confiscated at the Canadian border.

U.S. prosecutor defends treatment of Indian diplomat

By Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - The U.S. attorney in Manhattan defended on Wednesday the treatment of an Indian diplomat who was strip-searched after her arrest last week on charges of underpaying her nanny, a case that has strained U.S.-Indian relations.
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