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Parents jailed over baby's death from rickets in UK

A British judge on Friday jailed the parents of a five-month-old baby who died from rickets after they refused to seek medical help because of their religious beliefs. Nkosiyapha Kunene, 36, and his wife Virginia, 32, admitted the manslaughter of their son Ndingeko, who died on June 14, 2012, suffering from severe vitamin D deficiency. The couple are both members of the Seventh Day Adventist Church, a branch of Protestant Christianity, although the judge said their views "appear to be very extreme and do not reflect the official doctrine of that church".

Parents jailed over baby's death from rickets in UK

A British judge on Friday jailed the parents of a five-month-old baby who died from rickets after they refused to seek medical help because of their religious beliefs. Nkosiyapha Kunene, 36, and his wife Virginia, 32, admitted the manslaughter of their son Ndingeko, who died on June 14, 2012, suffering from severe vitamin D deficiency. The couple are both members of the Seventh Day Adventist Church, a branch of Protestant Christianity, although the judge said their views "appear to be very extreme and do not reflect the official doctrine of that church".

High-calorie diet may slow Lou Gehrig's disease

A diet rich in calories and carbohydrates may slow progression of the lethal, degenerative Lou Gehrig's disease, according to a small-scale study reported in The Lancet on Friday. Formally called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or motor neuron disease, the disorder affects nerve cells that control muscle movement. Patients become tired and weak and lose the power to move and eventually breathe; they die three years on average after being diagnosed.

Supplement users are seeking wellness: study

By Shereen Jegtvig NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who use multivitamins and other nutritional supplements tend to lead healthier lives overall, so taking supplements can be seen as a positive sign, suggests a new review of past research.

Michelle Obama unveils food 'label of the future'

In a country where obesity is rampant, First Lady Michelle Obama on Thursday aimed to make healthy choices easier for consumers by unveiling a series of proposed changes to food labels. Calories, added sugars and more realistic serving information would feature more prominently on more than 700,000 products, in a revamp she described as the "label of the future." "This will be the new norm in providing consumers with information about the food they buy," she said at a White House event. "So this is a huge deal."

Michelle Obama unveils food 'label of the future'

In a country where obesity is rampant, First Lady Michelle Obama on Thursday aimed to make healthy choices easier for consumers by unveiling a series of proposed changes to food labels. Calories, added sugars and more realistic serving information would feature more prominently on more than 700,000 products, in a revamp she described as the "label of the future." "This will be the new norm in providing consumers with information about the food they buy," she said at a White House event. "So this is a huge deal."

New nutrition labels on US food packages would highlight calories, sugars

WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is proposing new food labels that would make it easier to know about calories and added sugars, a reflection of the shifting science behind nutrition. Fat was the focus two decades ago when the labels first were created, but nutritionists are now more concerned with how many calories we eat Under the proposed changes, calories would be in larger, bolder type on food labels, and consumers for the first time would know whether foods have added sugars.

U.S. proposes major update to food labels in bid to combat obesity

By Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Packaged foods sold in the United States would display calorie counts more prominently and include the amount of added sugar under a proposal to significantly update nutritional labels for the first time in 20 years as health officials seek to reduce obesity and combat related diseases such as diabetes.

Michelle Obama calls for nutrition label changes

In a country where obesity is rampant, the US government on Thursday aimed to make healthy choices easier for consumers by proposing a series of changes to nutrition labels. If approved, the fine print would display calorie count more prominently, include more realistic descriptions of what amounts to a serving, and add a new line to detail "added sugars" -- not just total sugars.

Michelle Obama to call for nutrition label changes

First Lady Michelle Obama plans to announce a series of proposed changes to food labels Thursday, aiming to make healthy choices easier for consumers in a country where obesity is rampant. The revisions would relate to the required fine print to include more realistic descriptions of what amounts to a serving, mandatory potassium and vitamin D amounts, and a new line to detail "added sugars" -- not just total sugars.
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