Connect to share and comment

UN envoy warns of 'divisive' Iraq election campaign

Campaigning for Iraq's April 30 elections will be "highly divisive" as parties appeal to their sectarian bases at a time of worsening violence, the UN's envoy to Baghdad has warned. Nickolay Mladenov also pushed for Iraqi leaders to urgently pass a much-delayed annual budget within two weeks, noting that further postponing the spending bill would badly impact on drawing much-needed business and investment to the country.

UN envoy warns of 'divisive' Iraq election campaign

Campaigning for Iraq's April 30 elections will be "highly divisive" as parties appeal to their sectarian bases at a time of worsening violence, the UN's envoy to Baghdad has warned. Nickolay Mladenov also pushed for Iraqi leaders to urgently pass a much-delayed annual budget within two weeks, noting that further postponing the spending bill would badly impact on drawing much-needed business and investment to the country.

Election posters fill Baghdad as campaign starts

Campaigning for Iraq's April 30 general election opened Tuesday, with Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki bidding for a third term as his government grapples with the country's worst bloodshed in years. Iraqis face a long list of daily struggles, ranging from lengthy power cuts and poor running water and sewerage to rampant corruption and high levels of unemployment, to say nothing of a seemingly endless stream of attacks which have killed more than 2,200 people this year.

Election posters adorn Baghdad as campaigning under way

Campaigning for Iraq's April 30 general election opened on Tuesday, with Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki bidding for a third term as his government grapples with the country's worst bloodshed in years. Posters have gone up across Baghdad and around the country as candidates vie for one of 328 parliamentary seats. No single party is expected to win an absolute majority and previous elections have seen lengthy periods of government formation.

Iraq electoral commission retracts resignation before vote

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Members of Iraq's electoral commission retracted their resignations on Sunday, having threatened to quit en masse in protest against political interference just one month before a nationwide vote. The entire board of the Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) tendered its resignation last week, further complicating the outlook for polls that have already been clouded by violence across the country.

Iraq attacks kill nine, one month before elections

Attacks in Sunni-majority areas of Iraq killed nine people Sunday, exactly a month ahead of parliamentary polls that remain in disarray after the mass resignations of election commissioners last week. The violence came hours after seven soldiers were shot dead at a checkpoint in a late-night attack by militants in the north, the latest in a months-long surge in bloodshed that has killed nearly 500 people so far this month.

Iraq parties jump the gun on election campaign

Despite the disarray caused by the sudden mass resignation of election chiefs ahead of next month's polls, candidates for seats in the Iraqi parliament are pressing ahead with unofficial campaigning. Keeping the printing houses whirring, they have been putting up posters and distributing leaflets. But wary of breaking the rules, their early propaganda only obliquely refers to the polls, scheduled for April 30, or skirts election regulations by praising the security forces alongside party insignia.

UN hopeful for way out of Iraq vote impasse

The UN envoy to Iraq said Thursday there was a "window of opportunity" for Baghdad to resolve a pre-election crisis sparked by the resignation en masse of its election commission. Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki warned Wednesday that April 30 legislative elections may be delayed given Tuesday's resignations, and with violence at its worst in six years. But in New York, Nickolay Mladenov, the UN special representative to Iraq, gave a slightly more upbeat assessment.

Iraq PM warns of poll delay after election chiefs quit

Iraq's premier warned Wednesday that April legislative polls may be delayed as he pushed for a controversial election law to be amended after electoral chiefs suddenly quit complaining of political interference. The electoral officials are pressing for the same reform to the law ahead of the scheduled April 30 vote, amid doubts the polls can in any case be held countrywide as anti-government fighters still control a town on Baghdad's doorstep.

Pressure on Iraq election law after poll chiefs quit

Election officials pushed Wednesday for reform of Iraq's election law after polling chiefs suddenly handed in their resignations complaining of parliamentary and judicial interference, throwing next month's general election into disarray. The surprise decision by the board of Iraq's Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) a day earlier came with doubts already swirling over whether the April 30 polls could be held nationwide, with anti-government fighters in control of a city on Baghdad's doorstep.
Syndicate content