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Newfoundland cut moose hunting permits when herd counts fell: former bureaucrat

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. - Newfoundland and Labrador did not increase moose hunting licences after promising to protect drivers because government counts of the herd had declined, a former top bureaucrat testified Friday. Gary Norris, a former deputy minister for Tourism, Culture and Recreation in charge of wildlife, was called as a witness for the provincial government as it defends itself against a class-action lawsuit claiming it's liable for negligently failing to control the moose population.

Newfoundland government linked moose-vehicle accidents, hunting 10 years ago

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. - A former senior bureaucrat testified Thursday that the Newfoundland and Labrador government had research 10 years ago from its own scientists linking moose-vehicle collisions and the extent to which moose are hunted. Gary Norris said research reported as part of a review of how the province was handling such accidents indicated "a clear relationship between moose-vehicle collisions and moose harvests."

Moose collision lawsuit in Newfoundland alleges province was negligent

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. - A class-action lawsuit started Wednesday in St. John's, N.L., with emotional testimony from plaintiffs who said moose-vehicle crashes on provincial roads have devastated them. "I never had time to respond," said Ben Bellows, 57, of a 2003 accident that left him a quadriplegic. He sat in a wheelchair as he testified in provincial Supreme Court. The case alleges the province has negligently failed to manage the moose population. It involves 135 plaintiffs — including at least 15 estates of those who died — who were involved in accidents dating back to 2001.

Latest caribou count finds iconic Porcupine herd thriving in the North

WHITEHORSE - The caribou herd known for its epic annual migrations between the Northwest Territories and Alaska is thriving after a decade of decline. In sharp contrast to many of its southern and eastern cousins, the latest population count of the Porcupine caribou found the herd has hit record numbers for recent times. The herd has grown to an estimated 197,000 animals — the highest since biologists in Alaska, Yukon and the Northwest Territories began counting in 1972.

Saskatchewan researchers to capture moose with helicopter net gun

SASKATOON - Researchers will soon be taking to the air in a helicopter in the hope of capturing moose with a net gun south of Saskatoon. A University of Saskatchewan research team is trying to learn more about moose that live on farmland, including what they eat and when and where they cross roads. The university says a professional helicopter wildlife capture crew uses a special gun that shoots a net over the moose, and then a satellite tracking collar is attached to the animal. The team says it is a proven safe method that works well for capturing large animals.

Wildlife officials investigate video of hunter taking wounded deer for a ride

SASKATOON - Wildlife officials in Saskatchewan are investigating a video posted on Facebook that shows a hunter riding a wounded deer on a sled down a hill. The video shows a man on top of the bleeding animal sliding down the slope, while a person holding the camera provides commentary. The cameraman names the man riding the deer "we just shot," then yells at him to steer. "Keep on going. You got it. Stay on, stay on!" he yells.

48 reindeer killed by train in Sweden

Forty-eight reindeer have been killed in northern Sweden, struck by a speeding train they tried in vain to outrun, transport officials said Tuesday. "It wasn't pretty to see," one reindeer rancher, Ingmar Blind, told state television network SVT. The animals, which provide a livelihood for many in remote northern Sweden, met their fate on Saturday near the village of Kaitum in the country's Laponia region. Near-misses by railways are common as herds migrate during winter in search of food.

48 reindeer killed by train in Sweden

Forty-eight reindeer have been killed in northern Sweden, struck by a speeding train they tried in vain to outrun, transport officials said Tuesday. "It wasn't pretty to see," one reindeer rancher, Ingmar Blind, told state television network SVT. The animals, which provide a livelihood for many in remote northern Sweden, met their fate on Saturday near the village of Kaitum in the country's Laponia region. Near-misses by railways are common as herds migrate during winter in search of food.

Deer culls loom in B.C. communities as politicians target urban bucks and does

VICTORIA - The mayor of Oak Bay, British Columbia, gets dead deer alerts. Nils Jensen barely has time to sit for a coffee when his phone pings and signals another tragic deer fatality in the suburban Victoria community known as the Tweed Curtain for its primarily elderly and refined population. "I get regular updates," Jensen said, as he gestured to his cell phone. "There it is, the deer count, 38 so far."

Gov't to halve deer population within 10 yrs

The Environment Ministry said Thursday it will work to halve the population of deer within 10 years in the face of damage to farm products and mountain forest resources caused by the animal. It is estimated that there were around 3.25 million deer in Japan in fiscal 2011, and the ministry aims to reduce the number to 1.60 million by fiscal 2023, given that they caused damage worth more than 8.3 billion yen, up from 3.9 billion yen in fiscal 2005.
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