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Return the treasures Britain looted, Chinese tell Cameron

British Prime Minister David Cameron faced demands Wednesday for the return of priceless artefacts looted from Beijing in the 19th century, on the last day of his visit to China. Cameron travelled to the southwestern city of Chengdu on the third day of what embassy officials said was the largest ever British trade mission to the country. British officials say deals worth 5.6 billion pounds ($9.2 billion) have been signed so far on the trip, but Cameron has been derided by both Chinese state-run media and the country's sharp-tongued Internet users.

Return the treasures Britain looted, Chinese tell Cameron

British Prime Minister David Cameron faced demands for the return of priceless artefacts looted from Beijing in the 19th century on Wednesday, the last day of his visit to China. Cameron travelled to the southwestern city of Chengdu on the third day of what embassy officials said was the largest ever British trade mission to the country. British officials say 5.6 billion pounds ($9.2 billion) worth of deals have been signed so far on the trip, but Cameron has been derided by both Chinese state-run media and the country's sharp-tongued Internet users.

Return the treasures Britain looted, Chinese tell Cameron

British Prime Minister David Cameron faced demands for the return of priceless artefacts looted from Beijing in the 19th century on Wednesday, the last day of his visit to China. Cameron travelled to the southwestern city of Chengdu on the third day of what embassy officials said was the largest ever British trade mission to the country. British officials say £5.6 billion-worth of deals have been signed so far on the trip, but Cameron has been derided by both Chinese state-run media and the country's sharp-tongued Internet users.

Newspaper accuses Cameron, on trade trip, of meddling in China's affairs

By Andrew Osborn SHANGHAI (Reuters) - A Chinese state newspaper on Tuesday accused British Prime Minister David Cameron, in Shanghai on a visit aimed at deepening trade cooperation, of meddling in China's affairs. The Global Times newspaper published an editorial headlined "China won't fall for Cameron's 'sincerity'" in which it accused Britain of backing Japan in a row with Beijing about airspace over the East China Sea and said London had been meddling in Hong Kong, its former colony.

Britain an 'old country' for tourists and students: China media

Britain should recognise it is not a big power but "just an old European country apt for travel and study", Chinese state-run media snapped Tuesday as Prime Minister David Cameron visits. "China won't fall for Cameron's 'sincerity'," the headline of the sharply-written editorial in the Global Times newspaper said, after Beijing was outraged by Cameron's meeting with the Dalai Lama last year.

UK's Cameron clashes with Brussels over EU-China trade

By Andrew Osborn and Ben Blanchard BEIJING (Reuters) - British Prime Minister David Cameron promised China's leaders on Monday he would advocate a multi-billion-dollar free trade deal between Beijing and the European Union, riling the EU executive which rejected the move as premature. On a three-day visit with around 100 business people, the largest-ever British mission of its kind, Cameron said Britain was the Western country most open to Chinese investment and well-placed to take advantage of China's market liberalization.

UK's Cameron emphasises business in China visit

British Prime Minister David Cameron stressed his country is open to Chinese investment Monday on his first visit to China since meeting the Dalai Lama, keeping human rights to the sidelines. Cameron, whose meeting with the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader in 2012 was condemned by Beijing and led to a diplomatic deep-freeze between the two nations, emphasised business ties as he began what embassy officials called the "the largest British trade mission ever to go to China". Cameron also vowed to push for a free-trade agreement between China and the EU.

UK's Cameron emphasizes business on China visit

British Prime Minister Cameron vowed to push for a free-trade agreement between China and the EU.

UK's Cameron emphasises business in China visit

British Prime Minister David Cameron emphasised trade on Monday in his first visit to China since incurring Beijing's wrath for meeting the Dalai Lama. Cameron arrived in the world's second-biggest economy with "the largest British trade mission ever to go to China" in tow, said a statement about the trip from the British embassy. His first official meeting was with Premier Li Keqiang, who made an apparently oblique reference to the patching up of a dispute over Cameron's May 2012 meeting with the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, whom Beijing reviles as a separatist.

Cameron tweets in Mandarin on Weibo for China trip

British Prime Minister David Cameron has joined Sina Weibo, China's version of Twitter, and posted his first message ahead of a visit to Beijing, Downing Street said Saturday. "Hello my friends in China. I'm pleased to have joined Weibo and look forward to visiting China very soon," he said in English and Mandarin in his first message. It has since been forwarded more than 24,000 times. Cameron has attracted more than 101,000 followers since setting up his account, which helpfully points out that he has the star sign Libra.
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