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Rio ramps up security after deadly unrest

Just 50 days before Brazil hosts the World Cup, authorities beefed up security Wednesday in Rio de Janeiro after a violent clash between residents and police in a slum near the tourist haven of Copacabana beach. Dozens of military police, including members of a feared special forces battalion, moved into the Pavao-Pavaozinho slum, which is also near the well-heeled Ipanema district, an AFP journalist reported.

Rio security ramped up after deadly unrest

Just 50 days before Brazil hosts the World Cup, authorities beefed up security Wednesday in Rio de Janeiro after a violent clash between residents and police in a slum near the tourist haven of Copacabana beach. Dozens of military police, including members of a special forces battalion, moved into the Pavao-Pavaozinho slum, which is also not far from the well-heeled Ipanema district, an AFP journalist reported.

Rio security ramped up after deadly unrest

Just 50 days before Brazil hosts the World Cup, authorities beefed up security Wednesday in Rio de Janeiro after a violent clash between residents and police in a slum near the tourist haven of Copacabana beach. Dozens of military police, including members of a special forces battalion, moved into the Pavao-Pavaozinho slum, which is also not far from the well-heeled Ipanema district, an AFP journalist reported.

Venezuelan court rules suspected U.S. agent can be held in custody

Caracas, Apr 23 (EFE).- A 32-year-old American citizen suspected of being a U.S. agent will remain in custody following a ruling Wednesday by a court in Venezuela, the Attorney General's Office said. Todd Michael Leininger was arrested last Saturday in the southwestern state of Tachira, where he has lived for two months with his Venezuelan wife. Leininger will be held under preventive arrest on attempted murder, arms and criminal conspiracy charges, the AG's office said, citing the rule by the court in Tachira.

WikiLeaks source gets a new, female name: Chelsea Manning

Bradley Manning, the US soldier convicted of leaking a trove of secret documents to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks, will now be legally known as Chelsea Manning, a judge ruled Wednesday. Manning is serving a 35-year prison sentence at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas and had requested the name change after court-martial proceedings revealed the soldier's emotional turmoil over sexual identity.

Rio ramps up security after deadly unrest

Just 50 days before Brazil hosts the World Cup, authorities beefed up security Wednesday in Rio de Janeiro after a violent clash between residents and police in a slum near the tourist haven of Copacabana beach. Dozens of military police, including members of a feared special forces battalion, moved into the Pavao-Pavaozinho slum, which is also near the well-heeled Ipanema district, an AFP journalist reported.

U.S. soldier convicted of WikiLeaks crimes granted name change

By Carey Gillam (Reuters) - Former U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, who is serving 35 years in prison for turning over classified files to WikiLeaks, can exchange the name Bradley for Chelsea to reflect her desire to be treated as a woman, a judge in Kansas ruled on Wednesday.

U.S. soldier convicted of WikiLeaks crimes granted name change

By Carey Gillam (Reuters) - A judge in Kansas on Wednesday ruled that former U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, who is serving 35 years in prison for turning over classified files to WikiLeaks, could change his name to reflect his desire to be treated as a woman. Manning's name is legally changed to Chelsea Elizabeth Manning, according to the decision handed down by Leavenworth County District Judge David King.

Brazilian Congress passes Internet bill of rights

By Anthony Boadle BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazil's Senate unanimously approved groundbreaking legislation on Tuesday that guarantees equal access to the Internet and protects the privacy of Brazilian users in the wake of U.S. spying revelations. President Dilma Rousseff, who was the target of U.S. espionage according to documents leaked by former NSA analyst Edward Snowden, plans to sign the bill into law. She will present it on Wednesday at a global conference on the future of the Internet, her office said in a blog.

Report: Attacks on payment systems grab headlines, but trail other kinds of cybercrime

NEW YORK, N.Y. - While the theft of millions of credit card numbers from Target customers last year drew attention to Internet crime, a new study finds that breaches of retail payment systems are less common than other kinds of attacks. A report from Verizon found that Internet attacks in which data were compromised resulted more often from various small online acts, such people clicking on malicious Web links and choosing easy-to-guess passwords.
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