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Hagel: Pentagon to triple cyber staff as America's use of cyberspace outpaces security for it

WASHINGTON - The Pentagon plans to more than triple its cybersecurity staff in the next few years to defend against Internet attacks that threaten national security, Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel said Friday. Hagel's comments at the National Security Agency headquarters in suburban Washington come as he prepares to vist China next week, where officials are likely to challenge him amid reports of aggressive U.S. cyber spying.

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a long-awaited plan Thursday to end the US government's bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over surveillance on millions of Americans. Responding to a global outcry over the National Security Agency's extensive eavesdropping programs, Obama's plan would require telephone companies to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, with government agencies allowed to access it with court approval.

Internet providers get low transparency grades amid surveillance concerns

OTTAWA - Canada's Internet service providers are being less than forthcoming about how they handle customer information — including whether they routinely give personal data to spy agencies, says a new report. The report by University of Toronto researchers gives low marks to all 20 providers ranked in 10 categories of transparency.

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a long-awaited plan Thursday to end the US government's bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over surveillance on millions of Americans. The shake-up, which also follows a global outcry over the National Security Agency's extensive eavesdropping programs, would require telephone companies to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, with government agencies only being allowed to access it with court approval.

White House unveils plan to end NSA's bulk collection of phone data

By Roberta Rampton and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration on Thursday announced details of its plan to end the government's vast bulk collection of data about phone calls made in the United States, including new procedures to get judicial approval before asking companies for such records. Under the plan, phone companies would have to provide data from their records quickly and in a usable format when requested by the government, a senior administration official told reporters on condition of anonymity.

UN panel urges US to rein in global snooping

Washington must shake up its overseas surveillance programme, shut Guantanamo, hold Americans accountable for "war on terror" violations and stem racism in the justice system, a UN panel said Thursday. In a wide-ranging report on the United States' respect for international rules, the UN Human Rights Committee faulted the current system of oversight for National Security Agency (NSA) snooping.

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a plan Thursday to end bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over the government's sweeping surveillance activities on millions of Americans. In measures taken in response to a global outcry over the National Security Agency's eavesdropping programs, Obama said telephone companies would be required to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, while allowing government agencies to access it with court approval.

Obama puts forward plan ending NSA bulk collection

President Barack Obama put forward his plan Thursday to end US government bulk collection of Americans' telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over mass surveillance. "I have decided that the best path forward is that the government should not collect or hold this data in bulk," Obama said, as he unveiled a formal proposal to reform procedures for the National Security Agency.

Obama says NSA to cease bulk data collection in US

President Barack Obama said Thursday the US government will end its bulk collection of Americans' telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over mass surveillance. "The best path forward is that the government should not collect or hold this data in bulk," Obama said, as he unveiled a formal proposal to reform procedures for the National Security Agency. ico-rl/dc

U.S. agency wants armed police at airport checkpoints, counters

By Ian Simpson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Transportation Security Administration recommended on Wednesday that armed law enforcement officers be posted at airport checkpoints and ticket counters during peak hours. An agency review, prompted by a deadly Los Angeles airport shooting incident last fall, called for setting standards in airports that allow officers at checkpoints and ticket counters to roam rather than hold set positions.
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