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At least 15 dead in Central African Republic clashes - Red Cross

BANGUI (Reuters) - At least 15 people were killed in intercommunal violence in Central African Republic's capital Bangui on Thursday, the head of the local Red Cross said, as the beleaguered country swore in a new leader determined to end waves of killing. "There has been a lot of violence with machetes. There's a large number of dead...We are sure of 15 dead. But this is still only a partial death toll," Antoine Mbao Bogo told Reuters. (Reporting by Joe Bavier)

New C. African president set to take reins of crisis-wracked country

The new president of Central African Republic, Catherine Samba Panza, will be sworn in Thursday with a mission to end atrocious sectarian violence and tackle an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. She will be sworn in at a ceremony due to begin at 2:00 pm (1300 GMT), succeeding Michel Djotodia, who was installed as the country's first Muslim president by his mainly Muslim Seleka rebels after a coup in March 2013.

Clashes kill at least 10 in C. Africa capital

At least 10 people were killed in fresh clashes Wednesday in the conflict-riven Central African Republic capital, witnesses said, just two days after new leader Catherine Samba-Panza appealed for peace. Violence pitting civilians and Christian militiamen against ex-Seleka fighters broke out overnight in central Bangui, near a prison and a military barracks housing the former rebels, they told AFP. Witnesses who asked not to be named said they saw the bodies of six former fighters and four Christian civilians near the prison building.

New leader raises hopes of end to bloodshed in C. Africa

The Central African Republic's new leader pledged Tuesday to choose her cabinet based on skills rather than religion as she sought to end months of Christian-Muslim bloodshed. A day after Catherine Samba-Panza, the mayor of the capital Bangui, was elected interim president by the transitional parliament, residents said the city was unusually calm, apart from isolated acts of looting by gangs of youths.

New leader raises hopes of end to bloodshed in C. Africa

The Central African Republic's new leader pledged Tuesday to choose her cabinet based on skills rather than religion as she sought to end months of Christian-Muslim bloodshed. A day after Catherine Samba-Panza, the mayor of the capital Bangui, was elected interim president by the transitional parliament, residents said the city was unusually calm, apart from isolated acts of looting by gangs of youths.

New leader raises hopes of end to bloodshed in C. Africa

The new leader of the Central African Republic pledged Tuesday to form a government based on skills rather than religion as she sought to end months of Christian-Muslim bloodshed. A day after Bangui's mayor Catherine Samba-Panza was elected transitional president by the interim parliament, residents said the capital was unusually calm, apart from isolated acts of looting by gangs of youths. The city remained under nightly curfew and was patrolled by French and African soldiers.

Central African Republic names new leader, EU to send troops

By Paul-Marin Ngoupana and Adrian Croft BANGUI/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Central African Republic lawmakers chose their capital's mayor to become interim president on Monday and lead the country out of months of sectarian killings, as the European Union agreed to send in 500 troops to help restore order. The change in leadership and deepening international involvement in the former French colony follow waves of killing and looting that have forced 1 million people - nearly a quarter of the population - to flee.

Eight run for Central African Republic presidency, violence flares

By Paul-Marin Ngoupana and Emmanuel Braun BANGUI (Reuters) - Central African Republic lawmakers shortlisted eight candidates, including two sons of former leaders, to run for interim president in a vote on Monday and pull the country out of months of turmoil and sectarian killings. Whoever is chosen will face the challenge of ending a cycle of violence that on Sunday saw crowds kill two men they said were Muslims and drag their bodies through the streets of the capital Bangui, then set them on fire.

'Seeds of genocide' in Central African Republic, U.N. warns

By Emmanuel Braun and Tom Miles BANGUI/GENEVA (Reuters) - A senior U.N. official warned on Thursday of the risk of genocide in Central African Republic without a more robust international response to communal bloodshed in which at least eight more people were killed overnight. The former French colony descended into chaos after a mostly Muslim rebel coalition, Seleka, seized power in March, unleashing a wave of killings and looting that sparked revenge attacks by Christian militia known as "anti-balaka" (anti-machete).

At least seven killed in C. Africa as parliament seeks new leader

At least seven people were killed in overnight clashes in the Central African Republic's capital of Bangui, according to a compiled toll Thursday from the Red Cross and AFP. The renewed violence came as the highly unstable country's transitional parliament was meeting to elect a new interim president, after strongman Michel Djotodia resigned last week under intense regional pressure.
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