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Some furloughed employees trickling back to work despite continued government shutdown

WASHINGTON - In the space of a week, Chris Vaccaro was furloughed from his government post, called back to work and then furloughed again in head-spinning events that left him feeling like a human yo-yo. "It's been odd having to switch your mindset off and on," said Vaccaro, communications director at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Shutdown impact: Utah footing bill to reopen parks, Congress ensures death benefit continues

The government shutdown continues with some hope for those who would like to visit the nation's national parks: The Obama administration said it would allow the states to use their own money to pay for park operations. Arizona, Colorado, New York, North Dakota and Utah were among those that jumped at the chance.

Shutdown impact: Utah footing bill to reopen parks, Congress ensures death benefit continues

The government shutdown continues with some glimmer of hope for those who would like to visit the nation's national parks: The Obama administration said it would consider offers from the states to use their own money to pay for park operations and Utah jumped at the chance.

U.S. EIA to cease publishing data due to government shutdown

(Reuters) - The U.S. Energy Information Administration on Friday said it will not publish its weekly inventory and other data after today due to funding issues related to the government shutdown. EIA said it will cease operations and furlough staff at the end of the day. The agency told energy companies to continue submitting their data to the EIA. The information will be processed after the furlough period is over, it said.

Shutdown impact: Some national parks could reopen; taxes still due for some 12 million

The government shutdown continues with some glimmer of hope for those who would like to visit the nation's national parks: The Obama administration said it would consider offers from the states to use their own money to pay for park operations. Meanwhile, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission sent roughly 90 per cent of its staff home Thursday, though it will respond to immediate safety concerns.

Engineering firm URS furloughs 3,000 employees due to U.S. shutdown

(Reuters) - URS Corp <URS.N>, which builds and operates energy and other industrial projects, said it has temporarily laid off about 3,000 employees due to the U.S. government shutdown. The furlough includes employees who are unable to work because the government facilities where they work are closed or the company had received a stop-work order or directions to reduce staff.

Federal courts likely to stay open despite government shutdown

By Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - Federal courts across the country are likely to remain open and fully staffed if the government shutdown extends into a third week, even if the U.S. judiciary runs out of funding. The administrative office of the U.S. courts in Washington, D.C., said on Thursday that the court system will continue to use fees and other revenue sources not tied to the annual budget to finance its operations through at least October 17.

State Dept splurges on handcrafted glassware

Just before budgets were frozen and thousands of government staff were sent home without pay, the US State Department awarded a contract of up to $5 million to a US glassmaker for handcrafted tableware. The five-year deal, which was set at a minimum of $25,000 but could go up to $5 million, went to the Vermont-based company, Simon Pearce, for "lead-free stem and tableware," State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said.

Correction: Shutdown-FAA story

WASHINGTON - In a story Oct. 7 about the federal government shutdown, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Federal Aviation Administration is recalling to work employees who register new planes. Those employees have not been recalled. A corrected version of the story is below: FAA brings back some workers as shutdown drags on FAA brings back some furloughed safety inspectors, other workers as partial shutdown drags on By JOAN LOWY Associated Press

Defense shares end mixed after Pentagon recalls workers

By Andrea Shalal-Esa WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Shares of Lockheed Martin Corp, the Pentagon's biggest supplier, and some other defense companies rallied on Monday after Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel recalled most civilian defense employees despite the ongoing shutdown of the U.S. government. Lockheed shares closed $1.06 higher at $123.56 on the New York Stock Exchange, while shares of Northrop Grumman Corp closed $1.66 or 1.78 percent higher at $94.98. Raytheon Co shares closed 1.3 perent higher at $75.22.
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