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Ski industry sees no immediate impact on season because of National Forest Service furloughs

DENVER - A group representing the nation's ski industry said Monday it expects no major impact on this year's ski season because of federal furloughs, even though about a third of the more than 350 resorts are located on federal land regulated by the U.S. Forest Service. Michael Berry, spokesman for the National Ski Areas Association, said most expansion projects and construction that require federal approval have been completed as opening days approach in the $6 billion a year industry. Delays could occur as a result of other projects in the pipeline, he said.

Lockheed Martin furloughing 20 per cent fewer workers than it initially expected

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Lockheed Martin said Monday that it is furloughing about 2,400 workers due to the government shutdown — 20 per cent less than the defence contractor had initially planned. On Friday Lockheed Martin announced that it was going to furlough 3,000 employees because of the government shutdown.

Lockheed trims layoffs tied to US government shutdown

Defense contractor Lockheed Martin on Monday reduced the number of workers it planned to lay off after the Pentagon slashed the number of its workers idled by the government shutdown. Lockheed, the lead contractor for the F-35 fighter jet, said it would have to temporarily send home only 2,400 employees without pay, rather than the 3,000 it announced last week after the partial government shutdown due to Congress's budget impasse. The government shutdown from October 1 saw some 350,000 Defense Department civilian employees furloughed.

United Technologies cancels planned furlough of 2,000 workers as defence workers return

HARTFORD, Conn. - United Technologies Corp. cancelled a planned furlough of 2,000 workers after the Department of Defence recalled most of its civilian employees. The Hartford, Conn.-based defence contractor planned to furlough 2,000 workers starting Monday. Its Sikorsky division makes Black Hawk helicopters for the military and relies on government inspectors, who were furloughed.

Recall of most Pentagon workers and back-pay bill take a bite out of political impasse

WASHINGTON - For days lawmakers have debated which federal workers should be put back to work. Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel ended the argument Saturday for most Pentagon civilian employees, ordering nearly all 350,000 back on the job. That's a large chunk of the estimated 800,000 federal workers on furlough because of the partial government shutdown. All those in the government off the job or working without paychecks would benefit from a bill the House approved Saturday without dissent that orders them to be paid once the shutdown ends.

Pentagon recalls most furloughed civilians

Most of the estimated 350,000 civilian employees furloughed by the Defense Department during the US government shutdown will be recalled to work, the Pentagon said Saturday. In a conference call with reporters, Department of Defense officials roughly estimated some 90 percent or more of civilian employees would be allowed to return to their jobs, and aimed to bring many back as soon as Monday. "These people want to get back to work, and we want them back at work," Undersecretary of Defense and Comptroller Robert Hale told reporters.

Pentagon recalls most furloughed civilians

Most of the estimated 350,000 civilian employees furloughed by the Defense Department during the US government shutdown will be recalled to work, the Pentagon said Saturday. Pentagon officials estimated that about 90 percent or more of civilian employees would be allowed to return to their jobs, and aimed to bring many back as soon as Monday. "These people want to get back to work, and we want them back at work," Defense Department Comptroller Robert Hale told reporters in a conference call.

Pentagon recalling most civilian defense employees idled by shutdown

By Phil Stewart WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Pentagon said on Saturday it will recall most of the roughly 400,000 civilian Defense Department employees sent home during the government shutdown, in a move that could greatly lessen the impact of feuding in Washington on U.S. armed forces. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said a legal review of the "Pay Our Military Act," signed by President Barack Obama on Monday on the eve of the shutdown, would allow him to bring a still-unspecified number of civilians back to work next week.

Pentagon recalls most furloughed civilians

Most of the estimated 400,000 civilian employees furloughed by the Defense Department during the US government shutdown will be recalled to work, Pentagon chief Chuck Hagel said Saturday. "Today I am announcing that most DoD civilians placed on emergency furlough during the government shutdown will be asked to return to work beginning next week," he said in a statement.

Business Highlights

___ US housing rebound likely to handle spike in rates LOS ANGELES (AP) — When mortgage rates began climbing in May from rock-bottom lows, Kevin Williams worried he might miss out on an opportunity. So he listed his home in Orange County, Calif., and planned to buy a bigger house in San Diego after it sold. The process took all summer. Last week, he and his wife locked in a mortgage. The extra time added at least $1,000 more a year than if they had secured a loan in May. Still, Williams believes they made a prudent decision.
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