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US military braces for full effect of shutdown

The US government shutdown had no drastic effect on the military on Tuesday but if it remains in place everything from ship repairs to combat training will be disrupted, officials said Tuesday. With about half the Pentagon's 800,000 civilian employees placed on unpaid leave, defense officials said the military will soon face a headache trying to make do with less civilian manpower under the shutdown. "There's going to be an impact, but it will take some time to feel the effect," said a senior military officer.

Intelligence chiefs deem shutdown 'insidious' danger to U.S.

By Patricia Zengerle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. intelligence community leaders warned on Wednesday that the government shutdown, now in its second day, is an "insidious" threat to national security that will increase the longer thousands of workers are off the job. "I've been in the intelligence business for about 50 years. I've never seen anything like this," James Clapper, the U.S. Director of National Intelligence, said at a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the eavesdropping programs.

US military braces for full effect of shutdown

The US government shutdown had no drastic effect on the military Tuesday but if it remains in place everything from ship repairs to combat training will be disrupted, officials say. With about half the Pentagon's 800,000 civilian employees placed on unpaid leave, defense officials said the military will soon face a headache trying to make do with less civilian manpower under the shutdown. "There's going to be an impact, but it will take some time to feel the effect," said a senior military officer.

Asian stock markets remain calm despite partial shutdown of US govt following budget stalemate

BANGKOK - Asian stock markets dealt calmly Wednesday with a partial U.S. government shutdown precipitated by the failure of lawmakers to agree on a temporary funding measure so the nation can pay its bills. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index rose 0.7 per cent to 23,013.23. Australia's S But Japan's Nikkei 225 index fell 0.7 per cent to 14,382.11 after the government Tuesday announced it would go ahead with a sales tax increase in April. The tax, intended to offset the country's soaring public debt, will rise from 5 per cent to 8 per cent.

Washington workers lock up, post 'out of office' emails

Washington's subway was filled as usual Tuesday with resigned workers trekking to their desks, but on this day they arrived only to lock up and leave "out of office" messages. Sporting security badges and clutching backpacks as on any other weekday, disgruntled federal employees accused Congress of making them forego pay indefinitely due to a bitter budget deadlock. "They are not doing their job and now they are preventing us from doing our jobs," said an incensed Christine Baughman, who works for the Environmental Protection Agency.

US government powers down; Obama blasts 'ideological crusade' by House GOP

WASHINGTON - Congress hung "Closed" signs on a big swath of the government Tuesday and sent home 800,000 workers in what President Barack Obama labeled an "ideological crusade" by the GOP. On Capitol Hill, Democrats and Republicans traded blame for the first partial government shutdown in nearly two decades. Barricades sprang up early Tuesday at the Lincoln Memorial and other monuments, and the National Park Service was turning off 45 fountains around the capital city. National parks from Acadia in Maine to Denali in Alaska followed suit, as did many federal workplaces.

U.S. government workers feel sting of being 'non-essential'

By Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. government shutdown has divided hundreds of thousands of workers into "essential" and "non-essential," bruising egos and leaving many grappling with the financial toll of unpaid leave. "I'm heading in to be non-essential," said one jeans-clad Environmental Protection Agency worker as she joined many others headed to work on Tuesday to cancel upcoming meetings, lock up files and put out-of-office messages on email and voicemail.

Impact of U.S. govt shutdown on S. Korean market not significant: finance ministry

SEJONG, Oct. 1 (Yonhap) -- The immediate impact of the U.S. government shutdown would not be significant on the South Korean market, but the government will keep close tabs on any global developments as a prolonged impasse in Washington could intensify market volatility, the finance ministry said Tuesday. The U.S. government went into a partial shutdown as of 1:00 p.m., Seoul time, as lawmakers missed the deadline to pass a budget amid sharp differences in Congress over how to deal with President Barack Obama's health care program.

Washington workers lock up, post 'out of office' mails

Washington's subway was filled as usual Tuesday with resigned workers trekking to their desks, but on this day they arrived only to lock up and leave "out of office" messages. Sporting security badges and clutching backpacks as on any other weekday, disgruntled federal employees accused Congress of making them forego pay indefinitely due to a bitter budget deadlock. "They are not doing their job and now they are preventing us from doing our jobs," said an incensed Christine Baughman, who works for the Environmental Protection Agency.

Furloughed workers told not to check emails, voicemails or do any work if sent home

WASHINGTON - Federal workers will still have to report to work for about four hours Tuesday even though the government is shutting down. With no late deal averting the midnight Monday shutdown, several federal agencies say employees would be limited to doing work related to the shutdown, including changing voicemail messages, posting an out-of-office message on email, securing work stations and documents and completing time cards.
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