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Abe shows reluctance to build new war memorial to replace Yasukuni

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday dismissed the idea of building a new memorial to replace the war-linked Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, amid tensions with Asian neighbors, saying the Shinto shrine is a major venue for mourning. "I don't think it is appropriate for the state to build a new facility and say 'Please do it here from now'," Abe told a symposium in Tokyo. Yasukuni is "a main place for mourning," he continued, saying that "such a feeling is shared by family members" of the war dead.

BOJ determined to achieve inflation goal, Kuroda tells Abe

Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda met with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday and conveyed the central bank's strong intention to achieve its inflation goal, which might cause it to take additional steps to boost the economy. "There was nothing special," Kuroda told reporters after visiting Abe at the prime minister's office, denying Abe had asked him to ease monetary conditions further to achieve the goal of an annual 2 percent rise in consumer prices.

Abe kept playing golf after bird flu virus detected

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe continued playing golf Sunday even after a highly pathogenic avian influenza was detected at a Japanese farm, but the government's spokesman defended him Monday, denying any problem in his crisis management. "There was only a low level of infection risk. We made a comprehensive judgment. (Abe) did not need to stop playing golf," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a press conference.

Abe inspects maglev train test line with Kennedy

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe inspected a magnetically levitated train system's test line Saturday with U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy. Abe, who offered support for the United States to introduce maglev technology in a meeting with President Barack Obama in February last year, invited Kennedy to join the inspection of Central Japan Railway Co.'s line in Yamanashi Prefecture west of Tokyo.

Abe to shun visit to Yasukuni Shrine as summit with Obama draws near

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will probably not visit a war-linked shrine during its spring festival in late April, sources close to him said Thursday, apparently to make upcoming Japan-U.S. summit talks a success and avoid aggravating neighboring Asian countries. Instead of visiting Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo during its Annual Spring Festival from April 21 through 23, Abe is expected to make a "masakaki" tree offering as he did last spring, the sources said.

Abe to shun visit to Yasukuni Shrine as summit with Obama draws near

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will probably not visit a war-linked shrine during its spring festival in late April, sources close to him said Thursday, apparently to make upcoming Japan-U.S. summit talks a success and avoid aggravating neighboring Asian countries. Instead of visiting Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo during its Annual Spring Festival from April 21 through 23, Abe is expected to make a "masakaki" tree offering as he did last spring, the sources said.

Abe to visit Europe from late April to early May, join OECD meeting

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is planning to visit Europe from late April to early May, during which he will attend a ministerial meeting of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in Paris, Japanese government sources said Wednesday.

Abe willing to attend OECD meeting in May in Paris

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Wednesday expressed his intention to attend a ministerial meeting of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development scheduled for May in Paris. "Japan is to chair the ministerial council meeting (of the OECD). If circumstances allow, I would like to go to Paris and deliver a keynote speech" during the May 6-7 session, Abe told a symposium in Tokyo that marked the 50th anniversary of Japan's accession to the club of wealthy nations.

Japan opposition leader warns Abe against destabilizing East Asia

The leader of Japan's main opposition party criticized Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday, saying his remarks and acts concerning World War II-related history worry neighbors in East Asia and could further destabilize the region. "The Abe government has gone beyond the boundary of 'healthy nationalism' and could be a factor that makes East Asia unstable," Banri Kaieda, president of the main opposition Democratic Party of Japan, said in a speech in Washington.

Japan opposition leader warns Abe against destabilizing East Asia

The leader of Japan's main opposition party criticized Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday, saying his remarks and acts concerning World War II-related history worry neighbors in East Asia and could further destabilize the region. "The Abe government has gone beyond the boundary of 'healthy nationalism' and could be a factor that makes East Asia unstable," Banri Kaieda, president of the main opposition Democratic Party of Japan, said in a speech in Washington.
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