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Japan's Abe faces wartime history at Anne Frank house

By Geert De Clercq AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - At a visit to the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said on Sunday that nations must face the facts of history, and his spokesman said there was no contradiction with his recent controversial visit to the Yasukuni war shrine at home.

Japan PM hails 'lessons of history' on Anne Frank visit

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited the Anne Frank museum in Amsterdam on Sunday, hailing the lessons of history ahead of his first meeting with South Korean President Park Geun-Hye. "We would like to face historical facts in a humble manner and we would like also to pass on the lessons and facts of history to the next generation," Abe said during the visit to the Jewish girl's former hideout. "By doing so I wish to encourage peace in the entire international community," he told journalists, stood in front of photographs of Anne Frank.

Abe to seek 'future-oriented' Japan-S. Korea ties at summit

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Sunday the upcoming trilateral summit involving Japan, South Korea and the United States would be a step toward "future-oriented" ties with Seoul, indicating a desire to improve the strained diplomatic relationship between regional neighbors.

Abe leaves for Netherlands to attend Nuclear Security Summit

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe departed Sunday for the Netherlands to attend the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague. On the sidelines of the conference, Abe is expected to attend a trilateral summit with U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Park Geun Hye, possibly on Tuesday, during which the three are expected to confirm their cooperative stance in addressing North Korea's nuclear and missile issues.

Park to hold three-way summit with Obama, Abe next week

By Chang Jae-soon SEOUL, March 21 (Yonhap) -- South Korean President Park Geun-hye will hold three-way talks with U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the sidelines of an international nuclear conference in The Hague next week, the foreign ministry announced Friday. The meeting, though not one-on-one, will mark the first formal talks between Park and Abe since they took office more than a year ago, and it signals a thaw in relations between Seoul and Tokyo that have frayed badly over issues related to Japan's 1910-45 colonial rule of Korea.

Park to hold three-way summit with Obama, Abe next week

By Chang Jae-soon SEOUL, March 21 (Yonhap) -- South Korean President Park Geun-hye will hold three-way talks with U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the sidelines of an international nuclear conference in The Hague next week, an official said Friday. The meeting, though not one-on-one, will mark the first formal talks between Park and Abe since they took office more than a year ago, and it signals a thaw in relations between Seoul and Tokyo that have frayed badly over issues related to Japan's 1910-45 colonial rule of Korea.

Japan's Abe hopes wage increases will spread to medium-sized firms

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said on Wednesday he expects that moves to raise the wages of the country's workers will spread from large companies to medium-sized firms. Increasing wages is important to Abe's efforts to have monetary stimulus and huge fiscal spending spur consumer spending and pull the country out of 15 years of deflation and uncertain growth.

Ex-gov't official slams Abe's push for collective self-defense

A former senior government official on Friday criticized Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to change Japan's interpretation of the Constitution to allow it to exercise the right to collective self-defense, saying the move goes against democratic principles. Kyoji Yanagisawa, who served as assistant chief Cabinet secretary from 2004 to 2009 including during Abe's first term as prime minister, said of the move, "Gaining the understanding of the public and going through the proper process (of amending the Constitution) is the basis of democracy."

Japan PM Abe says 'no change' to wartime sex slave apology

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Friday that his government would not revise a landmark 1993 "comfort women" apology, and said he was "deeply pained" by the suffering of women drawn into a system of wartime brothels. Abe, who has made similar remarks in the past, has faced criticism for his government's plan to review what is known as the Kono statement, which acknowledged official complicity in the coercion of military sex slaves, a historical legacy that draws raw resentment in neighbouring South Korea.

Japan's Abe says won't alter 1993 apology on 'comfort women'

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said on Friday that his government would not revise a landmark 1993 apology to women, many Korean, forced to serve in wartime military brothels, as Washington presses for better ties between its two Asian allies.
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