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Japanese growth slows as sales tax hike looms

Japan's economy grew at a slower pace than initially thought in the last quarter of 2013, revised data showed Monday, underscoring concerns about the pace of recovery under by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's policy blitz. The fresh figures will turn the focus on to Bank of Japan policymakers as they start a two-day meeting, with speculation they could unveil further monetary easing measures to counter a possible slowdown from a sales tax rise next month.

Japanese growth slows as sales tax hike looms

Japan's economy grew at a slower pace than initially thought in the last quarter of 2013, revised data showed Monday, underscoring concerns about the pace of recovery under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's policy blitz. The fresh figures will turn the focus on to Bank of Japan policymakers as they start a two-day meeting, with speculation they could unveil further monetary easing measures to counter a possible slowdown from a sales tax rise next month.

Abe to meet press Mon. before anniv. of 2011 earthquake

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will hold a press conference on Monday, one day before Japan marks the third anniversary of the massive earthquake and tsunami in 2011, the government said Friday. Abe is expected to explain to the public about the ongoing efforts and future policy of the government to rehabilitate the country's northeast, which has been affected not only by the natural disaster but also by the ensuing crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Japan protests New York Times editorial on Abe

The Japanese government has lodged a protest with The New York Times over its editorial earlier this month about Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's view on wartime history, its top spokesman said Tuesday. The editorial "contains significant factual errors," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a press conference, after the daily noted Abe has denied the 1937 Nanjing Massacre in China took place.

Japan protests New York Times editorial on Abe

The Japanese government has lodged a protest with The New York Times over its editorial earlier this month about Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's view on wartime history, its top spokesman said Tuesday. The editorial "contains significant factual errors," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a press conference, after the daily noted Abe has denied the 1937 Nanjing Massacre in China took place.

Abe aims to push N. Korea on abduction issue at bilateral talks

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Monday Japan will press North Korea to work toward a possible solution to the issue of abductions and other bilateral concerns, as diplomats from the two countries are expected to hold talks in China. "We will make thorough efforts to elicit a positive response from North Korea," Abe told a meeting of the government and ruling parties, referring to North Korea's abductions of Japanese nationals in the 1970s and 1980s.

China calls on "regional troublemaker" Abe to take credible actions

A spokesman of China's top political advisory body on Sunday said Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is a "regional troublemaker," urging him to take credible actions if he is serious about repairing bilateral relations. Lyu Xinhua, spokesman for this year's session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, said Abe's visit to the war-related Yasukuni Shrine in December has especially "undermined the political foundation" of relations between the two countries.

Abe to explain view on collective self-defense before Cabinet approval

Following pressure for more Diet debate, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Friday he will explain the government's views on lifting the ban on exercising the right to collective self-defense before obtaining Cabinet approval for the move. Abe has faced calls both from within his own ruling bloc and from opposition parties for discussion of the fundamental change to Japan's security posture, after initially saying he would explain his views after a decision by the Cabinet.

U.S. congressional report worried about Abe's views on history

A U.S. congressional research body has expressed concern that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's views on World War II and related wartime history could harm bilateral relations. A Feb. 20 report by the Congressional Research Service said that Abe's visit to the war-linked Yasukuni Shrine not only worsened Japan's already strained ties with China and South Korea but somewhat damaged mutual trust between Tokyo and Washington.

U.S. congressional report worried about Abe's views on history

A U.S. congressional research body has expressed concern that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's views on World War II and related wartime history could harm bilateral relations. A Feb. 20 report by the Congressional Research Service said that Abe's visit to the war-linked Yasukuni Shrine not only worsened Japan's already strained ties with China and South Korea but somewhat damaged mutual trust between Tokyo and Washington.
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