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Young survivors of sunken ferry suffering from acute stress

SEOUL, April 18 (Yonhap) -- Young students who escaped from the capsized ferry Sewol are under severe stress and depression that would require months of treatment, hospital officials said Friday. The 6,852-ton ferry, carrying 475 passengers sank off the southwest coast of South Korea on Wednesday, leaving at least 28 dead and 268 still missing. Among the passengers were 339 students and their teachers of Danwon High School in Ansan, just south of Seoul, who were heading to the southern resort island of Jeju for a school trip.

Diabetes complications show significant decline in past two decades

By Gene Emery NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Diabetes is becoming increasingly common in the United States, but the risks of complications from the blood sugar disease have declined since 1990, according to a new study. Better preventive care for adults with diabetes contributed to a 68 percent drop in their risk of heart attacks and a 64 percent drop in deaths from high blood sugar.

Lexicon Pharma's diabetes drug successful in mid-stage study

(Reuters) - Lexicon Pharmaceuticals Inc said its experimental drug to treat diabetes met the main goal of reducing the use of insulin at meal times in a mid-stage study on patients with type 1 diabetes. The company's shares rose about 19 percent to $1.89 in trading before the bell. Lexicon said the drug, codenamed LX4211, reduced the total dose of insulin taken by patients at meal times by 32 percent, compared with a 6 percent reduction in patients given a placebo.

U.S. FDA advisers recommend Mannkind's inhaled diabetes drug Afrezza

HYATTSVILLE, Maryland (Reuters) - Mannkind Corp's inhaled diabetes drug Afrezza is safe and effective for some diabetes patients with either the type 1 or type 2 form of the disease, U.S. health advisers said on Tuesday in recommending its approval for sales in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration's advisory panel, in a 13-1 vote, backed the rapid-acting insulin treatment for adults with type 1 diabetes despite lingering concerns over long-term safety and data that showed the drug did not work any better than traditional insulin.

App, doctor pep talks lower diabetes patients' blood sugar

By Ronnie Cohen NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Dr. Guillaume Charpentier believes a smartphone app he is testing on people with diabetes in France works best when it alerts doctors that frustrated patients need help managing their disease.

EU approves GSK's once-weekly diabetes drug

(Reuters) - GlaxoSmithKline Plc said on Wednesday that it had received European marketing approval for its once-weekly diabetes drug albiglutide, which it is marketing as Eperzan. The drug received a positive recommendation from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in January. GSK said it expects to launch albiglutide in several countries in Europe in the third to fourth quarter this year.

New York hospital warns patients of possible HIV, hepatitis exposure

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A New York hospital on Wednesday alerted more than 4,200 patients who may have received insulin of possible exposure to hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to possible blood contamination, officials and local media said. South Nassau Communities Hospital in Oceanside on Long Island, near New York City, said patients may have received insulin from a pen reservoir - not a single-use disposable needle - that could have been used on more than one patient.

FDA approves Endo's testosterone injection amid safety review of popular drug class

WASHINGTON - Drugmaker Endo Pharmaceuticals announced Thursday that it received U.S. approval for its long-acting testosterone injection Aveed, which joins a crowded field of hormone-boosting drugs aimed at aging American men.

B.C. covers cost of insulin pumps for Type 1 diabetics up to age 25

VICTORIA - Young British Columbians who monitor their Type 1 diabetes with an insulin pump will now get PharmaCare coverage for the equipment until they're 25 — up from the current age of 18. Health Minister Terry Lake says the province will cover up to $6,600 of the cost and that the average price of an insulin pump is about $6,500. Since 2008, PharmaCare has provided coverage of insulin pumps for patients up to age 18 after they've been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes or other forms of the disease requiring insulin.

B.C. covers cost of insulin pumps for Type 1 diabetics up to age 25

VICTORIA - Young British Columbians who monitor their Type 1 diabetes with an insulin pump will now get PharmaCare coverage for the equipment until they're 25 — up from the current age of 18. Health Minister Terry Lake says the province will cover up to $6,600 of the cost and that the average price of an insulin pump is about $6,500. Since 2008, PharmaCare has provided coverage of insulin pumps for patients up to age 18 after they've been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes or other forms of the disease requiring insulin.
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