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US regulators probing cardio risks in testosterone products

US federal regulators said Friday they were investigating products containing testosterone after recent studies suggested a higher risk of strokes and heart attacks in men being treated with the hormone. The Food and Drug Administration stressed, however, that it has "not concluded that FDA-approved testosterone treatment increases the risk of stroke, heart attack or death." "FDA is providing this alert while it continues to evaluate the information from these studies and other available data," it said in a safety alert, referring to two related studies.

FDA reviews safety of testosterone gels, patches and shots after studies suggest heart risk

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration says it is reviewing the safety of popular testosterone drugs for men in light of recent studies suggesting they can increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and death. A study published earlier this week suggested testosterone therapy could double the risk of those problems in men older than 65. Another study published in November found that the hormone increased the risk by 30 per cent. The FDA says it is evaluating information from those studies and others but hasn't yet reached any conclusion.

Want to be a sports star? Look in the mirror

The shape of a man's face can help predict his sporting acumen, according to a study on Wednesday that found Japanese baseball players whose faces were relatively broad rather than long were most likely to hit a home run. University of London psychologists measured the facial width-to-height ratio, or fWHR, of 104 batters in Japan's professional Central League Pennant who played in the 2011 and 2012 seasons. In both seasons, the players who scored the most home runs had the highest fWHR, said the study in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.

Prosecutors now unsure testosterone found at Pistorius home

South African prosecutors admitted late Wednesday they were no longer sure that a substance found at Olympian Oscar Pistorius's home was in fact testosterone, rowing back on dramatic court testimony hours earlier. "We can't tell what it is," said national prosecuting authority spokesman Medupe Simasiku. "We can't confirm or deny it until we get the forensic report." A police witness for the prosecution earlier said at Pistorius's bail hearing that they had found "two boxes of testosterone and needles and injections."

Testosterone, needles found at Pistorius home: police

Police searching the home of Olympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius found testosterone and needles in a dresser in his bedroom, an investigator told a South African court on Wednesday. Investigating officer Hilton Botha said the substance was found by police investigating the killing of Pistorius's girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine's Day. "We found two boxes of testosterone and needles and injections," Botha said. Testosterone is on the list of substances banned by the International Olympic Committee.

RPT-Baseball-MLB, players agree to expand drug testing

(Repeats to widen distribution) Jan 10 (Reuters) - Major League Baseball and the players' union have agreed to expand their drug program to include random in-season blood testing for human growth hormone and a new test for testosterone, they said on Thursday. The testing will start this season. MLB has been conducting random blood testing for the detection of HGH among minor league players since July 2010.

Baseball-MLB, players agree to expand drug testing

Jan 10 (Reuters) - Major League Baseball and the players' union have agreed to expand their drug program to include random in-season blood testing for human growth hormone and a new test for testosterone, they said on Thursday. The testing will start this season. MLB has been conducting random blood testing for the detection of HGH among minor league players since July 2010.
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