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Brazil starts HPV vaccination program

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff on Monday said the country was rolling out a vaccination program to protect five million 11-to 13-year-old girls against the human papilloma virus (HPV), which can cause cause cervical cancer. "The state has an obligation to protect all girls," Rousseff said as she inaugurated the program in Sao Paulo.

Cervical cancer kills more than 1,100 N. Korean women per year

SEOUL, Feb. 27 (Yonhap) -- More than 1,100 North Korean women are killed by cervical cancer every year, a recent report showed Thursday, possibly due to a lack of vaccination programs in the communist country. North Korea has a population of 10.09 million women aged 15 years and older who are at risk of developing cervical cancer. Current estimates indicate that every year 1,881 North Korean women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and 1,119 die from the disease, according to the report posted on the website of HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Information Center.

France announces 1.5-billion-euro anti-cancer plan

French President Francois Hollande on Tuesday announced a 1.5 billion euro ($2 billion) anti-cancer plan aimed at reducing inequalities in treatment of the disease. The 2014-2019 plan aims to give "the same chances to everyone everywhere in France" in preventing and fighting cancer, Hollande said in a speech to medical professionals. His announcement comes a day after the United Nations warned that new cases of cancer will rise by half by 2030, reaching 21.6 million per year compared to 14 million in 2012.

France announces 1.5-billion-euro anti-cancer plan

French President Francois Hollande on Tuesday announced a 1.5 billion euro ($2 billion) anti-cancer plan aimed at reducing inequalities in treatment of the disease. The 2014-2019 plan aims to give "the same chances to everyone everywhere in France" in preventing and fighting cancer, Hollande said in a speech to medical professionals. His announcement comes a day after the United Nations warned that new cases of cancer will rise by half by 2030, reaching 21.6 million per year compared to 14 million in 2012.

HPV at-home tests have a future, researchers say

By Kathleen Raven NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Certain tests can detect precancerous cervical cells from self-collected samples with nearly the same accuracy as a physician's swab taken in a clinic, according to a new review of past studies. Compared with those gathered by a physician, self-collected samples were about 11 percent less sensitive in identifying precancerous growth.

HPV test awareness, knowledge still low

By Shereen Jegtvig NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Americans are more aware that there is a test for the human papilloma virus (HPV) than counterparts in the UK and Australia, according to a new study, but few people knew much more than that. "Awareness of HPV has tended to be low but has been rising since the introduction of testing and vaccination," said Jo Waller, the study's senior author.

Cancer deaths rise to 8.2 million, breast cancer sharply up

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - The global death toll from cancer rose to 8.2 million in 2012 with sharp rises in breast cancer as the disease tightened its grip in developing nations struggling to treat an illness driven by Western lifestyles. Cancer deaths were up 8 percent from 7.6 million in a previous survey in 2008 and breast cancer killed 522,000 women last year, up 14 percent in the same period, according to the World Health Organisation's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

Virus linked to deadly cancer rates in China: researchers

Virus linked to deadly cancer rates in China: researchers SYDNEY, Dec. 12 (Xinhua) -- Medical researchers at a leading Australian university recently uncovered an alarming link between a common virus and the quadrupling of a string of deadly cancers in China. The deadly Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) increases the risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in China by almost four- fold, according to research led by University of New South Wales ( UNSW) academics.

Alberta expands HPV vaccine program to boys, second province to do so after PEI

EDMONTON - Alberta will start including boys in free school vaccinations that already protect girls from a virus that causes cervical and other types of deadly cancers. Health Minister Fred Horne says about 47,500 boys in Grades 5 and 9 are to receive the HPV vaccine next fall. "Expanding the HPV immunization program will mean both boys and girls will be protected from HPV-related cancers," Horne said Thursday. "Our investments today will reduce health-care costs tomorrow and, most importantly, prevent future cases of cancer in Alberta."

Older women still getting Pap smears despite guidelines

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuter Health) - Women who've had a hysterectomy, and most women over 65, don't need regular swabs for signs of cervical cancer - but lots of them are getting the test anyway, say U.S. researchers.
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