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British PM accused of fueling division with Christian talk

LONDON (Reuters) - A group of scientists, academics and prominent writers accused British Prime Minister David Cameron on Monday of stoking sectarian divisions through his repeated description of Britain as a "Christian country". The public figures, including authors Philip Pullman and Terry Pratchett, said they respected the Conservative leader's own religious beliefs, which he has addressed in a series of statements.

British PM criticised for saying UK is Christian country

British Prime Minister David Cameron was accused on Monday of sowing sectarianism and division after stressing in an Easter message that Britain was still a "Christian country". The criticism came in an open letter signed by 55 public figures, including writers Philip Pullman and Terry Pratchett and the Nobel Prize-winning scientists John Sulston and Harold Kroto. Cameron, a member of the established Church of England, has been increasingly vocal about his beliefs recently, and in an article published last week urged Christians to be "more evangelical" about their faith.

British culture minister quits over expenses spat

Maria Miller, the minister overseeing future regulation of Britain's press, has quit her cabinet post following a row over expenses, Downing Street announced on Wednesday. "Maria Miller has resigned as Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport," said a statement from Prime Minister David Cameron's office. Miller had faced a week of pressure from the main opposition Labour Party, and from her Conservative colleagues, over payments she had claimed linked to a mortgage.

British PM laughs off Twitter parodies of Obama call

British Prime Minister David Cameron on Friday laughed off the widespread mockery of a photo he posted on Twitter of him looking serious while on the phone to US President Barack Obama. In a tweet to actor Patrick Stewart, one of those who had parodied Cameron's photo, the premier posted a snap of a meeting with former US president Bill Clinton -- "this time face to face, not on the phone". On Wednesday, Cameron posted a photograph of himself discussing the situation in Ukraine in a telephone call with Obama.

British PM laughs off Twitter parodies of Obama call

British Prime Minister David Cameron on Friday laughed off the widespread mockery of a photo he posted on Twitter of him looking serious while on the phone to US President Barack Obama. In a tweet to actor Patrick Stewart, one of those who had parodied Cameron's photo, the premier posted a snap of a meeting with former US president Bill Clinton -- "this time face to face, not on the phone". On Wednesday, Cameron posted a photograph of himself discussing the situation in Ukraine in a telephone call with Obama.

Snapped document suggests UK caution over Russia sanctions

Britain opposes trade or financial sanctions on Russia over its intervention in Ukraine, media reports said on Tuesday, citing an apparently official document photographed as it was being carried into Downing Street. The document was snapped in the hand of a senior official walking into a meeting at Prime Minister David Cameron's office on Monday, according to the BBC and several newspapers. Apparently setting out Britain's options in the Ukranian crisis, it says "the UK should not support for now trade sanctions... or close London's financial centre to Russians".

British press says Merkel gave Cameron little to cheer

Britain's newspapers said Friday that Prime Minister David Cameron had little to cheer from German Chancellor Angela Merkel's visit as he seeks consensus on reforming EU migration rules. Merkel urged Britain on Thursday to stay in the European Union but played down Cameron's hopes that her trip to London would help bring major reforms on restricting freedom of movement within the bloc.

Merkel urges Britain to stay in EU but cool on reform

German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged Britain Thursday to stay in the EU but played down David Cameron's hopes that her visit to London would bring major reforms. The British premier rolled out the red carpet in his bid to woo fellow conservative Merkel, who gave a speech to both houses of parliament before taking tea with the queen. But Europe's most powerful politician was cool on Cameron's desire to change the EU's treaties ahead of a planned referendum on British membership of the bloc in 2017.

Britain opens inquiry into letters to IRA suspects

By Belinda Goldsmith LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister David Cameron announced on Thursday an independent inquiry into letters sent to IRA suspects, after an angry response to the freeing of an Irishman accused of a 1982 bombing that killed four soldiers in London. Cameron said it was clear that there had been a "dreadful mistake" in the case of John Downey, who walked free from a London court this month because of a letter which mistakenly told him he was longer being sought for prosecution.

British PM cancels Middle East trip over floods

British Prime Minister David Cameron said Tuesday he was cancelling a planned trip to Israel and the Palestinian territories next week to deal with devastating floods in England. Cameron was due to make the trip on February 18 and 19 although it had not officially been announced for security reasons. At a press conference about the floods that have affected huge swathes of southern England, the prime minister said he would continue to take personal command of the crisis.
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