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Mladic has 'case to answer': UN war crimes court

A UN war crimes court upheld all charges against Bosnian Serb ex-army chief Ratko Mladic on Tuesday, saying he "has a case to answer", including for his role in Europe's worst massacre since World War II. Mladic, 72, appeared before judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) half-way through his trial to hear whether they deem that enough evidence exists to continue trying him for his role in Bosnia's bloody 1992-95 war.

Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect arrested in France

French police arrested a Bosnian Serb former soldier suspected of detaining civilians inside a house and then setting it on fire, killing 59 people during Bosnia's 1992-1995 war, officials said Friday. Bosnian officials have requested Radomir Susnjar's extradition following his arrest, the war crimes prosecutor's office said in a statement. Susnjar is suspected of taking part in the June 1992 "killing of 59 Muslim civilians, among them women and children", in the eastern town of Visegrad.

Angelina Jolie in Bosnia to campaign against war rape

By Maja Zuvela SREBRENICA, Bosnia (Reuters) - Actress Angelina Jolie was brought to tears while talking to rape victims of the Bosnian war during a visit on Friday to promote a campaign to end sexual violence against women in war. "There can be no peace while women in conflict or post-conflict zones are raped with impunity," the Oscar-winning actress said in Sarajevo.

Angelina Jolie pays respect to Srebrenica victims

Hollywood star Angelina Jolie on Friday paid respect to victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre after urging the international community to stop the use of sexual violence as a war weapon. Jolie was accompanied to the ill-fated town by British Foreign Minister William Hague, while on a trip to Bosnia. At the Srebrenica memorial centre museum, Jolie and Hague met women who were raped during Bosnia's 1992-1995 war, as well as women whose beloved ones were killed in the massacre.

Bosnian Serb police jailed for war crimes

A Bosnian court sentenced three Bosnian Serb former policemen Thursday to 21 years in jail each for killing Muslim civilians at the start of the country's 1990s war. The three -- Dragomir Soldat, Velimir Djuric and Zoran Babic -- were found guilty of crimes against humanity, Bosnia's war crimes court said in a statement. The three were convicted of "taking part between April and September 1992 in systematic attacks of Bosnian Serb military and police forces against civilians in Prijedor," in northwestern Bosnia, said Judge Mira Smajlovic.

Anti-aircraft gun seized at Srebrenica ex-convict's home

Police on Wednesday seized an anti-aircraft gun and a large cache of other arms at the home of a Bosnian Serb who served eight years in jail for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, prosecutors said. Milenko Trifunovic, a former Bosnian Serb special police commander, and his aide were arrested during the search in Skelani, in eastern Bosnia, a prosecutor's statement said. The raid uncovered a 20-mm calibre M55 anti-aircraft gun of Yugoslav origin with 50 shells, an M53 machine gun, two automatic rifles, a shotgun and a pistol, a police official told AFP.

Mladic refuses to testify for old ally Karadzic at U.N. tribunal

By Thomas Escritt THE HAGUE (Reuters) - Former Bosnian Serb military chief Ratko Mladic refused on Tuesday to give evidence in support of one-time ally Radovan Karadzic, denouncing the U.N. war crimes tribunal as "satanic" and saying he did not want to incriminate himself. Mladic, the former general who headed separatist Bosnian Serb forces, and Karadzic, the political leader, are both accused of responsibility for the massacre of 8,000 Muslim men and boys in Srebrenica near the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war.

Bosnian Serb allies Mladic, Karadzic side by side in war crimes court

By Thomas Escritt THE HAGUE (Reuters) - Bosnian Serb wartime leaders Radovan Karadzic and Ratko Mladic appeared together for the first time before a U.N. war crimes court on Tuesday and Mladic sidestepped questions from his old ally relating to charges of conspiring to commit genocide. Mladic, the former general who headed separatist Bosnian Serb forces, and Karadzic, the political leader, are both accused of responsibility for the massacre of 8,000 Muslim men and boys in Srebrenica near the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war.

Mladic refuses to testify in Karadzic war crimes trial

Former Bosnian Serb army leader Ratko Mladic on Tuesday refused to testify at the trial of political counterpart Radovan Karadzic, despite a subpoena issued by the Yugoslav war crimes court. "I do not want to testify and refuse to testify for reasons of my health and that it would prejudice my own case," Mladic told the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), which he had previously labelled as "satanic".

Mladic refuses to testify in Karadzic war crimes trial

Former Bosnian Serb army leader Ratko Mladic on Tuesday refused to testify at the trial of his political alter ego Radovan Karadzic, repeatedly dismissing the UN's Yugoslav war crimes tribunal as "satanic". The hearing before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was supposed to shed light on the relationship between Karadzic and Mladic during the 1995 fall of Srebrenica and the siege of Sarajevo during Bosnia's bloody three-year war.
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