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Fever medicines may help spread flu if people feel better, have contact: study

TORONTO - Taking over-the-counter medications for the aches, pains and fever caused by flu may make people feel somewhat better, but it also could make them more contagious — resulting in increased cases and more deaths among the population, a study suggests. Researchers at McMaster University say medicines like ibuprofen and acetaminophen can ease some flu symptoms, including bringing down fever. "People often take — or give their kids — fever-reducing drugs so they can go to work or school," said David Earn, a professor of mathematics who led the study.

More infected in fresh wave of China bird flu - WHO

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Another 23 people in China have been infected with the H7N9 strain of bird flu in recent days, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday, adding to at least 24 new cases last week and confirming a fresh surge in the virus. With many people travelling within the country for upcoming Chinese New Year celebrations on January 31, the United Nations health agency also said people should be aware of the risk that flu viruses might spread more widely.

Shanghai reports two deaths in China bird flu outbreak

Two people have died from the H7N9 strain of bird flu in China's commercial hub Shanghai, including a medical doctor, the local government said Monday, the city's first fatalities from the virus this year. The victims included a 31-year-old surgeon who worked at the Shanghai Pudong New Area People's Hospital, the city health commission and hospital said, but gave no details on how he was infected.

Increasing toll of H7N9 bird flu demands constant vigilance

By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent LONDON (Reuters) - A big wave of H7N9 bird flu cases and deaths in China since the start of 2014 is a reminder that emerging flu strains need constant surveillance if the world is not to be caught off guard by a deadly pandemic. At least 24 H7N9 flu infections and three deaths have been confirmed in the past week by the World Health Organisation (WHO), a dramatic increase on the two cases and one death reported for the four-month summer period of June to September.

1st person to die of H5N1 flu in North America was registered nurse

RED DEER, Alta. - The first person to die of avian flu in North America was a registered nurse in a central Alberta hospital. The woman's family said in a statement Friday that she grew up in China and moved to Alberta on her own to studying nursing. She worked at the Red Deer Regional Hospital. "This was her dream and she studied and worked extremely hard to achieve this," the statement said. "She wanted to help people. She also wanted a career that would allow her to provide for her family and to support those she loved."

Alberta says it has enough flu vaccine to last until the end of the week

EDMONTON - Alberta Health Services said Thursday it has enough flu vaccine to meet demand until the end of the week. The government agency said after flu shot clinics across the province close, some vaccine will be held back for children who need a second shot and for potential flu outbreaks at hospitals or continuing care homes. The province estimates more than 1 million people in Alberta have been inoculated for the seasonal flu, including H1N1. As of Wednesday, eight people in the province had died from this flu.

Bugs will travel: Public health watches foreign outbreaks because diseases move

TORONTO - A Toronto grandmother came home from Hong Kong with SARS. A Colorado woman visited a Ugandan cave and brought back to the United States an alarming souvenir — Marburg fever, a cousin of Ebola. And now H5N1 bird flu has jumped the Pacific in the body of an Alberta woman. If you ever wonder why public health officials worry about far-flung diseases — the latest bird flu, the new MERS coronavirus — the incidents above pretty much explain it. Bugs travel. Or as public health folks like to put it, infectious diseases know no borders.

Bugs will travel: Public health watches foreign outbreaks because diseases move

TORONTO - A Toronto grandmother came home from Hong Kong with SARS. A Colorado woman visited a Ugandan cave and brought back to the United States an alarming souvenir — Marburg fever, a cousin of Ebola. And now H5N1 bird flu has jumped the Pacific in the body of an Alberta woman. If you ever wonder why public health officials worry about far-flung diseases — the latest bird flu, the new MERS coronavirus — the incidents above pretty much explain it. Bugs travel. Or as public health folks like to put it, infectious diseases know no borders.

New flu? Things you should know about H5N1, the original bird flu

TORONTO - Canada has reported the first case in North America of an infection with the H5N1 avian flu virus. An Alberta resident who had travelled to Beijing, China in December fell ill and died after returning. With H1N1 — seasonal flu — making headlines these days, this new development may trigger flu confusion. So here are some essential flu facts:

Fatal case of H5N1 bird flu reported in Alberta, first North American case

OTTAWA - Canada has reported North America's first case of H5N1 bird flu infection, in an Alberta resident who recently returned from a month's visit to China. The person, whose name and age were not revealed, was reportedly feeling ill on Dec. 27 while flying from Beijing to Vancouver and then on to Edmonton. The patient was admitted to hospital on Jan. 1 and died Jan. 3. Federal public health officials said confirmation of the rare exported H5N1 infection was made Tuesday evening and Canada informed officials of the World Health Organization on Wednesday.
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