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GOP ditches bedrock budget-cutting principle in debt vote, Obama no-bargain stance prevails

WASHINGTON - It was once the backbone of the House Republican majority — the hard-line stand that brought President Barack Obama to the negotiating table and yielded more than $2 trillion in deficit reduction. On Tuesday, it abruptly vanished, the victim of Republican disunity and a president determined not to bargain again.

US budget deal passes Congress

The US Senate passed a compromise two-year budget accord Wednesday, marking a truce in the fiscal wars that have plagued Washington and reducing the likelihood of a government shutdown in January. The measure, which already cleared the House and passed the Senate 64-36 with the support of nine Republicans and the entire Democratic caucus, now goes to President Barack Obama, who said he was "pleased" with the vote. He is expected to sign the legislation before heading to Hawaii on Friday for his Christmas break.

US budget deal passes Congress

The US Senate passed a compromise two-year budget accord Wednesday, marking a truce in the fiscal wars that have plagued Washington and reducing the likelihood of a government shutdown in January. The measure, which already cleared the House and passed the Senate 64-36 with the support of nine Republicans and the entire Democratic caucus, now goes to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign the legislation before he heads to Hawaii Friday for his Christmas break.

US budget deal clears key Senate hurdle

The Senate advanced a bipartisan budget deal Tuesday, virtually assuring passage of a bill that sets spending caps for the next two years and reduces prospects of a US government shutdown in 2014. The bill, which cleared a Senate procedural hurdle with a bipartisan 67-33 vote and has already won House approval, is now expected to pass Congress this week before lawmakers go on their year-end recess.

Top U.S. Republicans line up behind bipartisan budget deal

Top U.S. Republicans line up behind bipartisan budget deal WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 (Xinhua)-- U.S. House Speaker John Boehner on Wednesday dismissed criticism from some conservative groups which attacked the newly announced bipartisan budget deal before it was unveiled. "You mean the groups that came out and opposed it before they even saw it," Boehner said, in response to a question about the conservatives' opposition against the budget deal crafted by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan and Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty Murray.

US lawmakers announce two-year budget deal

Congressional negotiators on Tuesday reached a two-year deal on US spending which aims to avoid a repeat of the government shutdown that paralyzed Washington in October. President Barack Obama hailed the agreement as a sign of rare bipartisan cooperation in the strife-filled US legislature. "It's a good sign that Democrats and Republicans in Congress were able to come together and break the cycle of short-sighted, crisis-driven decision-making to get this done," the president said shortly after the deal was announced.

Democratic, GOP negotiators reach modest budget pact restoring $63B in automatic spending cuts

WASHINGTON - Shedding gridlock, key members of Congress reached a modest budget agreement Tuesday to restore about $63 billion in automatic spending cuts from programs ranging from parks to the Pentagon. The spending increases would be offset by a variety of increased fees and other provisions elsewhere in the budget totalling about $85 billion over a decade, leaving enough for a largely symbolic cut of about $23 billion in the nation's debt, now $17 trillion and growing.

Republicans to keep cuts if budget talks fail: Boehner

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner said on Thursday he hopes budget talks can lead to a fiscal 2014 spending plan, but if they fail Republicans intend to pursue a stop-gap measure that keeps automatic "sequester" spending cuts in place.

GOP, Democratic lawmakers meeting in hopes of limited budget deal, but divisive issues remain

WASHINGTON - Top negotiators on the budget maintained a conciliatory tone and promised Wednesday to genuinely try to find agreement to spare both the Pentagon and domestic agencies from automatic, indiscriminate spending cuts that are the price for Washington's repeated failures to strike a fiscal accord.

Both sides agree: No 'grand bargain' budget agreement in upcoming congressional negotiations

WASHINGTON - On this, GOP budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid can agree: There won't be a "grand bargain" on the budget. Instead, the Wisconsin Republican and the Nevada Democrat both say the best Washington can do in this bitterly partisan era of divided government is a small-ball bargain that tries to take the edge off of automatic budget cuts known as sequestration.
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