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First pot, now prostitution: Liberal party to debate legalization

OTTAWA - First it was pot; now it's prostitution. Liberals broke new ground at their last national policy convention, becoming the first federal party to advocate legalizing, regulating and taxing marijuana. And now some Grits want the party to take the same approach to the world's oldest profession.

Korean cartoons on former sex slaves to go on display at French festival

By Shim Sun-ah SEOUL, Jan. 14 (Yonhap) -- Cartoons about former Korean sex slaves to the Japanese military during World War II will be exhibited at the world's largest comic strip and cartoon festival, the Seoul government said Tuesday. Some 20 cartoons and four videos including animations by local artists telling tragic stories of the former sex slavery victims will be featured in a special exhibition of the 2014 Angouleme International Comics Festival, the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family said.

San Diego gang ran prostitution ring across U.S., prosecutors say

By Marty Graham SAN DIEGO (Reuters) - Two dozen gang members accused of running a vast, California-based human trafficking ring that sent women and underage girls across state lines for prostitution have been indicted on federal racketeering charges in a case prosecutors likened to modern-day slavery.

Upper chamber would be ideal for study of prostitution laws: ex-police chief

OTTAWA - A former police chief turned senator says the upper chamber would be an ideal venue for a comprehensive study of Canada's prostitution laws. Vern White, formerly Ottawa's chief of police, says the time is right for a national conversation on how to regulate and legislate around the sex trade. The Supreme Court of Canada recently struck down Canadian laws that made it illegal to solicit sex on the street, run a brothel or live off the avails of prostitution.

Supreme Court ruling forces prostitution policy front on Harper for 2014

OTTAWA - Call it the world's oldest legislative headache. A Conservative government that hoped to restore its fortunes in 2014 by talking about pipelines, international trade and victims of crime now will have to deal with the world's oldest profession. The Supreme Court of Canada effectively gutted Canada's prostitution laws by finding this week that legislation against street soliciting, living on the avails and keeping a brothel was unconstitutional. The court gave Parliament one year to come up with a new legislative scheme before the old laws are unenforceable.

Canada's high court strikes down curbs on prostitution

Canada's Supreme Court on Friday struck down key sections of a law that effectively criminalized prostitution by banning brothels and soliciting on the street, ruling that they endangered prostitutes. But it stayed its unanimous nine-to-zero ruling for one year to allow Parliament to consider whether or not to impose other limits on where and how prostitution may be conducted. This case was "not about whether prostitution should be legal or not," Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin said in the landmark decision.

A chronology of Canadian prostitution laws

OTTAWA - A chronology of some key events in the evolution of the country's prostitution laws: 1867: Canada essentially inherits anti-prostitution laws from Britain at Confederation. 1982: Charter of Rights and Freedoms signed into law. 1985: Parliament passes a law barring communicating in public for the purposes of prostitution in an effort to combat streetwalking. 1990: The Supreme Court hands down a reference upholding the street soliciting law, saying eliminating prostitution is a valid social goal.

Five things to know about the prostitution case decided by the Supreme Court

OTTAWA - Here are five things to know about Friday's Supreme Court of Canada ruling on prostitution: WHAT: The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the key provisions of the country's anti-prostitution laws, banning brothels, solicitation and living off the avails are unconstitutional. ___ WHY: The justices ruled unanimously that these provisions violate constitutional guarantees of life, liberty and security of the person. ___

Supreme Court strikes down Canada's anti-prostitution laws as Charter breach

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada started the clock ticking Friday for Parliament to reshape social policy dealing with the world's oldest profession, as political battle lines were drawn. In a unanimous 9-0 ruling on Friday, the high court struck down the country's prostitution laws, giving Parliament a year to produce new legislation. That means prostitution-related offences will remain in the Criminal Code for one more year.

Canada's high court strikes down curbs on prostitution

Canada's Supreme Court on Friday struck down key sections of a law that effectively criminalized prostitution by banning brothels and soliciting on the street, saying they endangered prostitutes. But it stayed its unanimous nine-to-zero ruling for one year to allow Parliament to consider whether or not to impose other limits on where and how prostitution may be conducted. This case was "not about whether prostitution should be legal or not," Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin said in the landmark decision.
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