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Supreme Court strikes down Canada's anti-prostitution laws as Charter breach

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada started the clock ticking Friday for Parliament to reshape social policy dealing with the world's oldest profession, as political battle lines were drawn. In a unanimous 9-0 ruling on Friday, the high court struck down the country's prostitution laws, giving Parliament a year to produce new legislation. That means prostitution-related offences will remain in the Criminal Code for one more year.

Canada's high court strikes down curbs on prostitution

Canada's Supreme Court on Friday struck down key sections of a law that effectively criminalized prostitution by banning brothels and soliciting on the street, saying they endangered prostitutes. But it stayed its unanimous nine-to-zero ruling for one year to allow Parliament to consider whether or not to impose other limits on where and how prostitution may be conducted. This case was "not about whether prostitution should be legal or not," Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin said in the landmark decision.

Top Canada court strikes down prostitution restrictions

By Randall Palmer OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada's Supreme Court struck down major restrictions on prostitution on Friday, including bans on brothels and street solicitation, declaring the laws unconstitutional because they violated prostitutes' safety. The sweeping 9-0 decision will take effect in one year, inviting Parliament to try to come up with some other way to regulate the sex trade if it chooses to do so.

Canada's high court strikes down curbs on prostitution

Canada's Supreme Court on Friday struck down key portions of a law that effectively criminalized prostitution by banning brothels and soliciting on the street, declaring this disproportionate. But it stayed its ruling for one year to allow Parliament to consider whether or not impose other limits on where and how prostitution may be conducted. amc/dc

Macedonian prostitutes march against discrimination

Prostitutes and other sex workers in Macedonia marched on Tuesday along the central streets of Skopje in a rare public protest, demanding decriminalisation of their profession and more rights. Carrying red umbrellas, a symbol of the global fight for sex workers' rights, about 100 prostitutes and human rights activists marched in silence to call for "respect of rights and better conditions" for prostitutes in the Balkan country.

Dutch prostitutes demand footballers' pension perks

Dutch prostitutes want to enjoy the same retirement perks as professional footballers because they also do "difficult physical work" in the prime of their lives, their lawyer said Tuesday. "Footballers and prostitutes both do a difficult physical job that they cannot do their whole life," said Wil Post, a lawyer for Freya, a company that wants to take over a prostitution business in central Dutch city of Utrecht. "Men prefer young women: there always comes an age when prostitutes no longer get any work," she told AFP.

Supreme Court to decide on validity of anti-prostitution laws on Dec. 20

OTTAWA - Canada's top court will bring down a landmark decision on the legality of the country's anti-prostitution laws next Friday. The ruling relates to challenges to laws against brothels, living off the avails and soliciting. Ontario's Appeal Court had previously struck down the laws against bawdy houses and altered the ban on living off the avails of prostitution to preclude exploitation. It also upheld the ban on street prostitution.

As France cracks down, German sex trade booms

"It's 30 euros for a blowjob, 40 for full sex!" With her confident French, youthful looks and skintight jeans, Andrea could be mistaken for a university student. In fact she is a self-employed businesswoman operating in a niche market on the verge of a boom: the cross-border sex trade between France and Germany. Half-Turkish and half-Romanian, Andrea practises the oldest profession in the world on a quiet wooded road on the outskirts of Saarbruecken, just a few hundred metres (yards) from the border with France.

French lower house votes to fine prostitutes' clients

PARIS, Dec. 4 (Xinhua) -- France's National Assembly, on Wednesday endorsed a law criminalizing the clients of prostitutes in a bid to curb human trafficking and protect women's rights. The lower house of parliament voted 268 to 138 the new legislation that would impose a fine of 1,500 euros (2,035 U.S. dollars) for men paying for sex. Offenders that insist in violating the ban risk paying a fine of 3,750 euros. A course will be proposed to make them aware of the risks involved in the sale of sex. The Senate will examine the bill in early 2014.

U.S. military court hears case on prostitution at Army base

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - A U.S. military court began hearing arguments on Monday in the case of a soldier accused of being a part of a suspected prostitution ring at Fort Hood, one of the largest Army bases in the United States. The Fort Hood case was part of a spate of embarrassing sex-related incidents in the military earlier this year that prompted Congress to look at ways to make top brass more accountable for the conduct of soldiers.
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