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U.S. movie studios sue Megaupload, founder Dotcom

By Bernard Vaughan NEW YORK (Reuters) - Several major U.S. studios filed a copyright infringement lawsuit on Monday against the file-sharing website Megaupload and its ebullient founder, Kim Dotcom. Megaupload, which U.S. authorities shuttered in 2012, facilitated a "massive copyright infringement of movies and television shows," according to a statement issued by the Motion Picture Association of America on Monday.

Internet lords keep .wine bottled for now

Internet overseers are keeping .WINE and .VIN online addresses bottled in the hope a few months of aging will make them more palatable. The head of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) was under directive by its board on Monday to put a temporary hold on the process of contracting .WINE and .VIN domain names.

Google pays $1.4 million fine in Italy over StreetView concerns

MILAN (Reuters) - Google has paid a 1 million euro ($1.4 million) fine imposed by Italy's data protection watchdog over complaints that cars it used to record images on Italian streets in 2010 were not clearly recognizable, the regulator said on Thursday. "Cars belonging to the giant of Mountain View roamed Italy's streets without being entirely recognizable as such, therefore not allowing the people present in those places to decide whether to be photographed or not," it said in a statement, referring to Google's base at Mountain View in California.

Alibaba's IPO architect lays out blueprint for e-commerce empire

By Paul Carsten and Matthew Miller HONG KONG/BEIJING (Reuters) - Alibaba, the world's biggest e-commerce company, changed how China shops. Now the man driving its blockbuster U.S. stock sale wants to transform the rest of the country's services industry, adding new users to the giant's 300 million customers.

ICANN chief: Russia, China will not hijack Internet oversight

By Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The head of a nonprofit that manages the infrastructure of the Internet defended on Wednesday the U.S. government's move to cede oversight of the body, and downplayed concerns that Russia, China or other countries could exert control and restrict the web's openness.

AOL poaches J&J executive to head global partnerships

(Reuters) - AOL Inc named on Wednesday Johnson & Johnson executive Kim Kadlec to a newly created position in charge of distribution partnerships for AOL's media properties such as TechCrunch, The Huffington Post and AOL On video network. Kadlec will serve as the head of relationship management and will report to AOL Chief Executive Tim Armstrong and the CEO of AOL's brand group Susan Lyne.

Yahoo in talks to buy News Distribution Network for $300 million: report

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Yahoo Inc is in preliminary talks to acquire online video service News Distribution Network for $300 million, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal on Monday. The deal could further Yahoo's efforts to bolster its online video programming and video advertising revenue, according to the report, which cited anonymous sources. NDN is a video syndication service that works with newspapers and other online publishers. Yahoo did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Google says Turkey intercepting its Web domain

Google says Turkey has been intercepting its Internet domain, redirecting users to other sites in the latest battle between Ankara and Web giants. In a weekend post on Google's security blog, software engineer Steven Carstensen said the company has received "several credible reports and confirmed with our own research that Google's Domain Name System (DNS) service has been intercepted by most Turkish ISPs (Internet Service Providers)."

In new social networks, anonymity is all the rage

When mobile social app Yik Yak swept into Auburn University, some of the coolest kids were quick to start posting on it. But no one knows who is saying what because the comments are anonymous. "It spread pretty fast," says Nickolaus Hines, a junior at the school in the US state of Alabama. "The majority of things are jokes or things which are obviously funny," said the 21-year-old. But "some ... are pretty mean."

Microsoft beefs up customer privacy policy

SEATTLE (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp, under fire for accessing an employee's private Hotmail account to prove he was leaking computer code to a blogger, has said it will now refer all suspicions of illegal activity on its email services to law enforcement. The decision, announced by head lawyer Brad Smith on Friday, reverses Microsoft's initial reaction to complaints last week, when it laid out a plan to refer such cases to an unidentified former federal judge, and proceed to open a suspect email account only if that person saw evidence to justify it.
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