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Judge tosses push for class-action status for lawsuit accusing Google of violating privacy

SAN FRANCISCO - A judge has tossed out an effort to win class-action status for a lawsuit accusing Google of violating the privacy terms of email users. U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh ruled late Tuesday that too many users have too many dissimilar claims to pursue a single class-action lawsuit that could expose the search engine giant to billions of dollars in potential losses.

Vietnam jails second blogger in a fortnight

Vietnam jailed a prominent blogger for 15 months on Wednesday on a charge of anti-state activity, the second such sentencing in a fortnight, prompting rights groups to condemn the alleged muzzling of dissent in the communist country. Pham Viet Dao, 61, a Communist Party member and a former official at the Ministry of Culture, was charged with "abusing democratic freedoms to infringe on the interests of the State" after a half-day trial in Hanoi.

Vietnam jails second blogger in a fortnight

Vietnam jailed a prominent blogger for 15 months on Wednesday on a charge of anti-state activity, the second such sentencing in a fortnight, prompting rights groups to condemn the alleged muzzling of dissent in the communist country. Pham Viet Dao, 61, a Communist Party member and a former official at the Ministry of Culture, was charged with "abusing democratic freedoms to infringe on the interests of the State" after a half-day trial in Hanoi.

Google, Viacom settle landmark YouTube lawsuit

By Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) - Google Inc has settled a landmark copyright lawsuit in which Viacom Inc accused the Internet search company of posting its programs on the YouTube video service without permission. The settlement ends seven years of litigation that drew wide attention from Hollywood, the music industry and Internet companies, and which tested the reach of a federal law designed to thwart piracy while letting people find entertainment online.

Berlin takes world lead with own domain name

Berlin became the world's first city on Tuesday to have its own Internet domain name under plans to cater for Internet expansion. Companies and individuals in the German capital can now request an Internet address ending in .berlin, beyond the traditional options of .com, .org or the German national ending .de. Obtaining a dot-berlin website address costs about 50 euros ($70) a year and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Fresh delay for Kim Dotcom extradition hearing

A US bid to extradite Megaupload boss Kim Dotcom from New Zealand for alleged online piracy has been pushed back again, court officials said Tuesday. The two-week extradition hearing was supposed to start on April 14 but will now begin on July 7, a Courts of New Zealand spokesman said. No reason was given for the delay but the hearing, originally slated for August 2012 at Auckland's North Shore District Court, has been repeatedly rescheduled amid legal wrangling over evidence disclosure.

New online platform wants to take on YouTube

(Reuters) - Wonder PL, a new video platform for lifestyle content that launched on March 13, is taking direct aim at YouTube and Vimeo while hoping to capitalize on the soaring popularity of online video. Backed by Universal Music Group, Qualcomm Ventures, former Apple executive Pascal Cagni and Andrew Creighton, president of Vice Media, Wonder features topics from wellness to food to entertainment targeting women.

Investors latch on to Yahoo's Alibaba stake as anticipation builds for Chinese company's IPO

SAN FRANCISCO - Yahoo is benefiting once again from its stake in China's hottest Internet company, Alibaba Group. Investors latched on to Yahoo Monday in anticipation of a huge windfall from Alibaba's initial public offering of stock later this year. Yahoo's stock gained $1.51, or 4 per cent, to close at $39.11. Alibaba ignited the excitement about its forthcoming IPO by announcing plans to list its stock on a U.S. exchange.

China e-commerce giant Alibaba gears up for US share offering that may raise $15 billion

HONG KONG - Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group plans to go public on a U.S. stock exchange, possibly raising up to $15 billion in the biggest initial public offering since Facebook. The announcement Sunday confirming plans for a U.S. share sale ended months of speculation over where the company would list after talks for an initial public offering in Hong Kong fell apart last year.

Web domain name revolution could hit trademark defence

The mass expansion of Internet domain names could cause havoc for the defence of trademarks in cyberspace, the UN's intellectual property body warned on Monday. "We have this extraordinary expansion that is going on," said Francis Gurry, head of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), which oversees global rules against cybersquatting.
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