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Philippine Supreme Court approves birth control law

The Philippines' highest court approved Tuesday a controversial birth control law that supporters said would transform the lives of millions of poor Filipinos, despite bitter opposition from the powerful Catholic Church. "The RH law is not unconstitutional," Supreme Court spokesman Theodore Te told reporters, announcing a ruling that struck down petitions against the reproductive health law by church groups. kma/ac

Appeals court upholds NYC ban on worship services in schools

By Bernard Vaughan NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York City's ban on religious worship services inside school buildings after hours was ruled constitutional on Thursday by a federal appeals court. In a 2-1 decision, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the New York City Board of Education's regulation, created so the city would not be perceived as endorsing religious activity in a public forum, "was consistent with its constitutional duties."

Supreme Court's rejection of U.S. campaign funding limits opens door for big-money donors

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down a key pillar of federal campaign finance law by allowing donors to give money to as many political candidates, parties and committees as they wish. In the latest in a series of decisions by the high court that have given big-money donors more influence in U.S. elections, the justices rejected the overall limits on how much individuals can donate during a federal two-year election cycle.

US court removes limits on overall campaign donations

The US Supreme Court on Wednesday removed the overall limit on contributions a donor can make to political candidates, a move which critics say could give rich individuals unfair influence over elections. The move was immediately hailed by Republicans, who are gearing up to challenge President Barack Obama's Democratic supporters for control of the Senate in November mid-term elections. The top court, in a 5-4 ruling read by Chief Justice John Roberts, did retain limits on the amount an individual donor can give to a single candidate but removed an overall cap.

US court removes limits on overall campaign donations

The US Supreme Court on Wednesday removed the overall limit on contributions a donor can make to political candidates, a move that could open the floodgates to campaign funding by rich individuals. The move was immediately hailed by Republicans, who are gearing up to challenge President Barack Obama's Democratic supporters for control of the Senate in October mid-term elections. The top court, in a five to four ruling read by Chief Justice John Roberts, did retain limits on the amount an individual donor can give to a single candidate but removed an overall cap.

Supreme Court struggles with companies' religious objections to law's birth control coverage

WASHINGTON - Seemingly divided, the Supreme Court struggled Tuesday with the question of whether companies have religious rights, a case challenging President Barack Obama's health overhaul and its guarantee of birth control in employees' preventive care plans. Peppering attorneys with questions in a 90-minute argument, the justices weighed the rights of for-profit companies against the rights of female employees. The discussion ranged to abortion, too, and even whether a female worker could be forced to wear an all-covering burka.

Supreme Court signals support for corporate religious claims

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court signaled on Tuesday it may allow corporations to mount religious objections to government action, possibly paving the way for companies to avoid covering employees' birth control as required under Obamacare.

Five important takeaways from Supreme Court's decision on Nadon appointment

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada issued a landmark ruling on Friday in rejecting the appointment of Justice Marc Nadon to the high court. Here are five key points to consider: 1. It was the second Supreme Court rebuke for the Harper government this week. On Thursday, the court ruled that a government attempt to take away early parole rights from some prison inmates was unconstitutional. The justices appear to be sending the message that even a majority government can't have everything its own way.

In U.S. contraception case, a question of corporate rights

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court could dodge the contentious question of whether corporations have religious rights when it weighs objections to an Obamacare requirement that employers provide insurance coverage for contraception.

Terada to succeed Takesaki as chief Supreme Court justice

Justice Itsuro Terada will succeed Hironobu Takesaki as chief justice of the Supreme Court, government and judicial sources said Thursday. Terada, 66, will become the top court's 18th chief justice succeeding Takesaki, 69, who will retire at the end of March for health reasons. The personnel change is expected to be approved by the Cabinet on Friday. Terada is the son of the late Jiro Terada, who was the 10th chief justice of the top court between 1982 and 1985.
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