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Nigerian state, army says most abducted schoolgirls still missing

By Lanre Ola MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - Nigeria's northeast Borno state said on Thursday only 20 of up to 129 schoolgirls abducted by Islamist rebels were back with their parents, and the military retracted an earlier statement in which it said it had freed most of them. The armed forces said on Wednesday that the military had freed all but eight of the schoolgirls abducted by Islamist rebels from the Boko Haram group in a rescue operation.

Nigeria military admits most kidnapped schoolgirls still missing

The Nigerian military on Friday admitted that most of the 129 girls abducted by Boko Haram Islamists from their school in the country's restive northeast remained missing. The military had claimed on Wednesday that all but eight of the 129 girls snatched from their school in the state of Borno managed to escape, contrary to the position of the state government and the school principal.

Nigerian state says most abducted schoolgirls still missing

By Lanre Ola MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - Nigeria's northeast Borno state said on Thursday only 20 of up to 129 schoolgirls abducted by Islamist rebels were back with their parents, casting doubt on a military claim to have freed most of them. The armed forces said in a statement on Wednesday that most of the schoolgirls abducted by Islamist rebels from the Boko Haram group had been freed in a military rescue operation.

115 Nigeria schoolgirls still missing after kidnap

A Nigerian school principal on Thursday denied military reports that most of the girls kidnapped by Islamist gunmen were now safe, as parents continued a desperate search for more than 100 children still held captive. A defence ministry spokesman, Chris Olukolade, claimed on Wednesday that all but eight of the 129 girls kidnapped from the Government Girls Secondary School in Chibok area of Borno state earlier in the week were now safe, citing the school's principal. But the same principal refuted the claim on Thursday.

115 Nigeria schoolgirls still missing after kidnap

A Nigerian school principal on Thursday denied military reports that most of the girls kidnapped by Islamist gunmen were now safe, as parents continued a desperate search for more than 100 children still held captive. A defence ministry spokesman, Chris Olukolade, claimed on Wednesday that all but eight of the 129 girls kidnapped from the Government Girls Secondary School in Chibok area of Borno state earlier in the week were now safe, citing the school's principal. But the same principal refuted the claim on Thursday.

115 Nigeria schoolgirls still missing after kidnap

A Nigerian school principal on Thursday denied military reports that most of the girls kidnapped by Islamist gunmen were now safe, as parents continued a desperate search for 115 children still held captive. A defence ministry spokesman, Chris Olukolade, claimed on Wednesday that all but eight of the 129 girls kidnapped from the Government Girls Secondary School in Chibok area of Borno state earlier in the week were now safe, citing the school's principal. But the same principal refuted the claim on Thursday.

Nigeria local authorities say most of abducted schoolgirls still missing

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - Authorities in Nigeria's northeast Borno state denied on Thursday a statement by the armed forces which had said most of the more than 100 schoolgirls abducted by Islamist rebels had been freed in a military rescue operation. "As I am talking to you now, only 14 of the students have returned," an aide to Borno State Governor Kashim Shettima told Reuters, asking not to be named.

115 Nigeria schoolgirls still missing after kidnap

A Nigerian school principal on Thursday denied military reports that most of the girls kidnapped from her school by Islamist gunmen were now safe, as the parents of those taken voiced anger over the conflicting claims. The defence ministry and the government in Borno state, where the attack took place, have said that 129 girls were abducted by Boko Haram militants from a secondary school in the Chibok area late Monday.

Nigeria parents demand answers after military says hostages freed

Anxious Nigerian parents demanded answers on Thursday about the fate of their daughters after the military claimed that 121 schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram Islamic extremists were now free. Defence spokesman Chris Olukolade had initially said that 129 girls were abducted by gunmen in the Chibok area of the northeastern Borno state late Monday. The mass kidnap -- which has sparked global outrage -- came just hours after the deadliest attack ever in the capital Abuja, where a bomb blast also blamed on Boko Haram killed at least 75 people.

Nigerian military says most of abducted schoolgirls freed, eight still missing

By Lanre Ola and Isaac Abrak MAIDUGURI/ABUJA (Reuters) - Nigeria's military said on Wednesday its forces had freed most of the more than 100 teenage schoolgirls abducted by Islamist Boko Haram militants and were continuing the search for eight students still missing. In a brief statement sent to media, spokesman Major General Chris Olukolade said one of the "terrorists" involved in Monday's abduction of female students from the Chibok government secondary school in northeast Borno state had been captured.
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