Connect to share and comment

U.S. senator demands CIA report amid dispute over torture study

By Patricia Zengerle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A member of the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday disclosed the existence of a secret Central Intelligence Agency document that committee members believe supports their conclusions in a study highly critical of "waterboarding" and other harsh counterterrorism practices.

9/11 suspect ejected by Gitmo judge after CIA outburst

One of the men suspected of planning the September 11, 2001 attacks was twice ejected from a US military court Tuesday after making outbursts about secret CIA prisons and torture. Yemeni defendant Ramzi Binalshibh, who is accused of helping the hijackers enter the United States and of financing the airliner attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people, also claimed that the judge hearing the case was biased. Binalshibh was initially removed from the latest pre-trial hearing at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba after twice being warned by the judge that he was disrupting the proceedings.

9/11 suspect ejected by Gitmo judge after CIA outburst

One of the men suspected of planning the September 11, 2001 attacks was twice ejected from a US military court Tuesday after making outbursts about secret CIA prisons and torture. Yemeni defendant Ramzi Binalshibh, who is accused of helping the hijackers enter the United States and of financing the airliner attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people, also claimed that the judge hearing the case was biased.

Russia accused over police violence

A Council of Europe panel on Tuesday asked Russia to stop submitting suspects in police custody to ill-treatment following allegations of electric shocks, punches and other use of force that could be considered as amounting to torture. Published after visits to several Russian "places of deprivation of liberty" in 2012, a report by the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) highlighted allegations of "extensive beating and asphyxiation with a plastic bag".

9/11 suspect removed from Gitmo hearing after outburst

One of the men accused of planning the September 11, 2001 attacks was removed from a US military court on Tuesday after making an outburst about a secret CIA prison. Yemeni defendant Ramzi Binalshibh, accused of helping the hijackers enter the United States and of financing the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people, was ejected from a pre-trial hearing at the Guantanamo Bay prison camp on the judge's orders. His removal came shortly after Binalshibh's lawyer suggested that guards at the US military prison in Cuba were deliberately depriving his client of sleep.

U.S. Congress, CIA still feuding over interrogations and secret prisons

By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Senate Intelligence Committee and the Central Intelligence Agency still have major disagreements over a huge report the committee is trying to complete that is highly critical of harsh counterterrorism practices such as "waterboarding," which the agency used under President George W. Bush.

Adulterers may be stoned under new Afghan law, official says

By Mirwais Harooni and Katharine Houreld KABUL (Reuters) - Death by stoning for convicted adulterers is being written into Afghan law, a senior official said on Monday, the latest sign that human rights won at great cost since the Taliban were ousted in 2001 are rolling back as foreign troops withdraw.

Poland must wrap up long-running CIA 'Black Site' probe

Poland must wrap up a long-running probe into an alleged CIA jail on its territory where suspected Al-Qaeda members were purportedly tortured, and hold those involved accountable, UN monitors said Friday. The UN Committee Against Torture criticised the "lengthy delays" in the five-year investigation of Warsaw's alleged complicity in the shadowy US programme. The committee said it was "also concerned about the secrecy surrounding the investigation and failure to ensure accountability in these cases."

Doctors complicit in torture at CIA, military prisons

Doctors and nurses tasked with monitoring the health of terror suspects were complicit in abuses committed at prisons run by the Pentagon and the CIA, an independent report said Monday. The Defense Department and the CIA demanded that the health care personnel "collaborate in intelligence gathering and security practices in a way that inflicted severe harm on detainees in US custody," according to the two-year study by the Institute on Medicine as a Profession.

Doctors complicit in torture at CIA, military prisons

Doctors and nurses tasked with monitoring the health of terror suspects were complicit in abuses committed at prisons run by the Pentagon and the CIA, an independent report said Monday. The Defense Department and the CIA demanded that the health care personnel "collaborate in intelligence gathering and security practices in a way that inflicted severe harm on detainees in US custody," according to the two-year study by the Institute on Medicine as a Profession.
Syndicate content